April 1, 2018

President Trump on Twitter Sunday rescinded his unfulfilled offer to work across the aisle with Congress to pass a law formalizing protections for young immigrants brought to the country illegally as children:

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) was implemented by the Obama administration via executive order in 2012. Trump rescinded it in September and gave Congress a deadline of March 5 to pass a DACA law. The deadline passed without a deal, though the issue is being litigated.

In a pair of follow-up tweets, Trump reiterated his desire to expand the wall along the southern border and claimed immigrants arriving illegally in the U.S. right now are trying to use DACA to stay in the country:

Contra Trump, immigrants who come to the U.S. in 2018 cannot avail themselves of DACA. As the website of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services details, DACA was limited to those who can demonstrate they were under the age of 31 as of June 15, 2012," came to the U.S. before they turned 16, have "continuously resided in the United States since June 15, 2007, up to the present time," and were "physically present in the United States on June 15, 2012." Bonnie Kristian

8:57 p.m.

We have our first stunning 2019 Emmys upset.

Fleabag's Phoebe Waller-Bridge just won the Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series in a massive upset over Julia Louis-Dreyfus.

Louis-Dreyfus was widely considered to be the race's front-runner, as she had never before lost the award for playing Selina Meyer on HBO's Veep, which concluded its final season earlier this year.

Had Louis-Dreyfus won for Veep's final season, she would have set the new record for most acting Emmys by a performer in history. She is still tied with Cloris Leachman for most wins. In her acceptance speech, Waller-Bridge, who previously won for writing, expressed as much surprise as prognosticators.

This could indicate that Fleabag itself, which also won a directing Emmy Sunday, could score an upset win over Veep in the night's top comedy category later in the evening. Veep won that prize for its past three seasons. Brendan Morrow

8:44 p.m.

Could Bill Hader have a Julia Louis-Dreyfus-style Emmys winning streak ahead of him?

Hader picked up the Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Emmy Sunday for the second year in a row for his acclaimed performance on HBO's Barry. He was widely considered the clear front-runner in the category and beat out The Kominsky Method's Michael Douglas and The Good Place's Ted Danson.

In his acceptance speech, Hader thanked co-creator Alec Berg, saying, "I don't know where I'd be without you."

Other actors who have won in this category twice in a row in recent years include Transparent's Jeffrey Tambor, The Big Bang Theory's Jim Parsons, and 30 Rock's Alec Baldwin. Prior to Hader's repeat win, Alex Borstein, who won the supporting actress in a comedy award for The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, also won her second consecutive Emmy Sunday. Brendan Morrow

8:41 p.m.

Fleabag creator and star Phoebe Waller-Bridge won the Emmy for Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series on Sunday night, and immediately cracked a few jokes onstage.

"I find writing really, really hard and really painful, and I'd like to say, honestly from the bottom of my heart, this the reason why I do it is this," she said, as she stared at her award. "So it's all made it really worth it, guys." After thanking her Fleabag colleagues, Waller-Bridge shared that it's "just really wonderful to know and reassuring that a dirty, pervy, messed-up woman can make it to the Emmys." Catherine Garcia

8:26 p.m.

Alex Borstein is having a marvelous night at the Emmys, as she just scored her second straight supporting actress win.

Borstein took home the Emmy Sunday for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series for her role on The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, previously winning the same award in 2018.

In her speech, Borstein thanked the cast and crew of Mrs. Maisel, including creator Amy Sherman-Palladino, as well as her grandmother, a Holocaust survivor.

Borstein joins the ranks of Betty White, Kate McKinnon, and Julie Bowen, who have all won this award at least two times. Brendan Morrow

8:16 p.m.

Tony Shalhoub just won a primetime Emmy for the first time in more than a decade.

Shalhoub took home the Emmy Sunday for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series for his role on Amazon's The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, beating out nominees like Barry's Henry Winkler, who won last year.

"It takes a village," Shalhoub said while thanking the crew behind Mrs. Maisel.

This is Shalhoub's first time scoring Emmy gold since he won Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series for Monk in 2006. He also won the same award for Monk in 2003 and 2005, making this Shalhoub's fourth Emmy win. He was nominated for Mrs. Maisel in 2018.

It's not Shalhoub's first time receiving awards recognition for Mrs. Maisel, though; he won the Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Comedy Series earlier this year. Brendan Morrow

1:27 p.m.

Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.), the chair of the House Intelligence Committee, seemed to have one foot on the impeachment trail Sunday during an appearance on CNN's State of the Union.

Schiff told host Jake Tapper that, although he's been reluctant to support impeachment measures against President Trump, the latest news out of the Oval Office might be changing his mind. Schiff said that if Trump did actually threaten to withhold military aid from Ukraine and repeatedly push Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden's son, Hunter Biden, then there might not be any other way around it. "We may very well have crossed the Rubicon," he said.

Schiff contends that the allegations represent "the most profound violation of the presidential oath" and that no privilege can cover corruption. As to whether it's true or not, Schiff argued that the president could just release the transcript of his call with Zelensky if there was nothing unsavory about it. "Clearly, he's afraid for the public to see," Schiff told Tapper. In other words, something stinks. Tim O'Donnell

12:53 p.m.

Iran's leaders already gave their two cents on the rising tensions between Tehran and the United States on Sunday. Tuns out, some folks in Washington who have had some experience dealing with Iran also had some things to say.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, appearing on CBS' Face the Nation, once again accused Iran of orchestrating the strikes against Saudi oil facilities last week, while repeating that he considers it "a state-on-state act of war." When host Margaret Brennan mentioned that Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif denies the allegations, Pompeo was not overly friendly to his counterpart, saying "it's beneath the dignity of anyone to listen to" him. But Pompeo did maintain he's looking for a diplomatic solution.

Former Secretary of State John Kerry and former Defense Secretary James Mattis shared some sentiments with Pompeo. In an appearance on ABC's This Week, Mattis said Tehran is doing what it's always done — "trying to craft a foreign policy that pushes others around." Mattis added that the U.S. needs to urge its allies to stand with Washington to prevent Tehran from destabilizing the Middle East.

Kerry, who helped foster the 2015 nuclear pact with Iran, also appeared on Face the Nation where he preached restraint when it came to dealing with Tehran and even praised President Trump for doing just that. But he did say that he thinks Iran was "one way or the other" behind the oil facilities attacks and that "our allies" who still support the 2015 agreement also "support holding Iran accountable for other issues in the region." Tim O'Donnell

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