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August 5, 2014
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Researchers using a computer model say that hepatitis C could become "rare" — affecting no more than 1 in 1,500 people — in the United States by 2036.

Right now, roughly 1 in 100 people have hepatitis C in the U.S., but newer medicines and expanded screenings for adults born between 1945 and 1965 could make the number drop. A study conducted by Jagpreet Chhatwal of The University of Texas MC Anderson Cancer Center in Houston and colleagues modeled the effect the medicines and screenings will have on hepatitis C, and found that it would become rare by 2036, and could even reach that goal by 2026 if there were stricter guidelines for screenings.

The researchers wrote in Annals of Internal Medicine that the screening regimen now would identify close to 487,000 cases of hepatitis C infection within the next 10 years, and using current conditions, 124,200 cases of liver cirrhosis, 78,800 cases of liver cancer, 126,500 liver-related deaths, and 9,900 liver transplants could be prevented by 2050.

"We were pleasantly surprised that in the next 22 years we could make this a rare disease," Chhatwal told Reuters.

Hepatitis C is a viral infection of the liver that, if left untreated, can lead to liver damage, liver failure, and cancer. The researchers say it costs $6.5 billion a year to care for the 3.2 million people in the United States with hepatitis C. Catherine Garcia

10:33 a.m. ET

The Navy on Friday confirmed responsibility for an obscene sky drawing made by a practicing aircrew over the town of Okanogan, Washington, northeast of Seattle.

The crew of an EA-18G Growler attack jet flew the plane in a pattern that "left a condensed air trail resembling an obscene image to observers on the ground," a Navy representative said. "The Navy holds its aircrew to the highest standards and we find this absolutely unacceptable, of zero training value," officials added, "and we are holding the crew accountable" for the phallic drawing.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said it will not be involved unless there was a safety violation because the agency "cannot police morality." Bonnie Kristian

10:26 a.m. ET
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Beijing said in state media reports Saturday "the traditional friendly relations between China and North Korea was founded and cultivated by both countries former old leaders, and is valuable wealth for the two peoples." The comments come after meetings in Pyongyang between representatives of both governments Friday.

The timing of the talks so soon after President Trump's conversations with Chinese President Xi Jinping during Trump's tour of Asia has led to speculation that Beijing may have conveyed a message from Washington. Pyongyang said Friday nuclear diplomacy will not proceed unless the U.S. and South Korea stop conducting joint military exercises. Bonnie Kristian

10:16 a.m. ET
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Former Secretary of State Hillary on Friday drew a contrast between Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.), who is "accepting responsibility, apologizing" for sexual misconduct allegations made against him, and President Trump and Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore, "who have done neither."

Her remarks came a day after Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) said Clinton's husband, former President Bill Clinton, should have resigned over the Monica Lewinsky scandal, while allowing that the political climate surrounding sexual misconduct was different in the 1990s. "Things have changed today, and I think under those circumstances, there should be a very different reaction," Gillibrand said. "And I think in light of this conversation, we should have a very different conversation about President Trump, and a very different conversation about allegations against him."

Gillibrand is historically a Clinton ally, and her comments are the latest development in the Democratic Party's renewed debate and division over sexual harassment and assault accusations against Bill Clinton. Clinton defenders argue it is disingenuous to suggest the former president escaped consequences for his behavior by putting him in the same category as Trump and Moore. Bonnie Kristian

10:01 a.m. ET

Thousands of Zimbabweans marched in the streets in cities around their country on Saturday, demanding an end to the rule of 93-year-old President Robert Mugabe, who has ruled Zimbabwe since 1980 and is widely considered a dictator. Marchers carried signs with slogans like, "no to Mugabe dynasty," "this is the Zimbabwe we want," and "selfless not selfish government."

The demonstrations come several days after the Zimbabwean military, backed by the ruling Zanu-PF party, put Mugabe and his wife, Grace, under house arrest. The couple are "ready to die for what is correct" and will not step down, Mugabe's nephew said Saturday as the army, which supports the protests, prevented demonstrators from marching into the Mugabes' official residence. Bonnie Kristian

8:17 a.m. ET
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President Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner did not give congressional investigators access to campaign-era email communications he is known to have had with Wikileaks about a "Russian backdoor overture," Senate Judiciary Committee leaders said in a letter Thursday. On Friday, citing an unnamed source familiar with congressional probes into Russian meddling with the 2016 election, CNN reported Kushner also denied any memory of those emails when testifying before Congress in July, contradicting the senators' account.

Kushner's attorney dismissed the story in a statement Friday night, maintaining Kushner was correct to say he did not have "contacts with Wikileaks, Guccifer, or DC Leaks." "From all I have now seen, his statement was accurate then as it is now," added Kushner lawyer Abbe Lowell. "In over 6 hours of voluntary testimony, Mr. Kushner answered all questions put to him and demonstrated that there had been no collusion between the campaign and Russia." Bonnie Kristian

7:59 a.m. ET

President Trump announced Friday he has delayed his decision on whether to maintain or eliminate an Obama-era prohibition on the import of trophies, like the tusks or skull, from elephants hunted for sport in Zimbabwe and Zambia.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, under the purview of Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, had indicated Thursday the ban would be lifted, a change the agency said could increase the number of elephants by encouraging big game population management. Critics believe it would put elephants at greater risk of extinction.

The Trump family has taken an interest in big game hunting in the past. The president's eldest son, Donald Trump Jr., hunted and killed an elephant on a trip to Zimbabwe with his brother Eric Trump in 2012. Bonnie Kristian

November 17, 2017
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The White House on Friday released an updated list of 25 potential Supreme Court nominees. There is no current vacancy on the Supreme Court, but the announcement does come on the same day as the national convention for the Federalist Society, a conservative legal organization whose members have made up a significant portion of President Trump's judicial picks.

The White House's statement specifically noted the president's commitment to "Make the Judiciary Great Again" and reaffirmed that his next Supreme Court nominee would be "in the mold of Justice [Neil] Gorsuch." Trump released his original list of potential Supreme Court nominees last May, before Gorsuch was eventually confirmed to replace the late Justice Antonin Scalia.

In October, Axios reported that Trump thinks he'll get the opportunity to nominate three more justices to the Supreme Court during his first term. Trump apparently told an individual who spoke to Axios that he would end up replacing Justice Anthony Kennedy, whose imminent retirement is a long-standing rumor on Capitol Hill; Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, because "what does she weigh? 60 pounds?"; and Justice Sonia Sotomayor, who is just 63 years old, because her health is "no good. Diabetes."

Neither the White House nor spokespeople for the Supreme Court justices in question commented on the Axios report. Kennedy has reportedly said that he plans to stay on the Supreme Court for at least another year, while Ginsburg has said that she wants to "do this job as long as I can do it full steam." Kelly O'Meara Morales

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