July 23, 2014
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Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.) says she just might make a second run at the White House in 2016, if only to ensure there is a female GOP-er in the race.

"The only thing that the media has speculated on is that it's going to be various men that are running," she told Real Clear Politics. "They haven't speculated, for instance, that I'm going to run. What if I decide to run? And there's a chance I could run."

Bachmann, who will retire from office when her term runs out at the end of the year, enjoyed a brief, early stint atop the 2012 GOP field. But her bid fizzled amid campaign defections and gaffes — most notably her claim that the HPV vaccine could cause mental retardation — and she withdrew after a dismal sixth-place finish in the Iowa caucuses. She has since become the subject of multiple ethics investigations, though she insisted the inquiries had nothing to do with her decision to leave office. Jon Terbush

11:41 a.m. ET
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You've probably seen them in your Facebook feed: the amusing sentences your friends got their smartphones to "write" simply by selecting the middle of three suggested words in their phone's autocomplete function over and over. The results rarely make much sense.

But that didn't stop an academic paper written entirely via iPhone autocomplete from being accepted by a scientific conference just three hours after submission. A New Zealand professor named Christoph Bartneck received an invitation to submit a paper to a nuclear physics gathering, but he's not a physicist. So instead he wrote an entire "study" using text predictions on his iPhone. He'd begin a sentence with a word like "atomic" or "nuclear" and let iOS take it from there.

"The atoms of a better universe will have the right for the same as you are the way we shall have to be a great place for a great time to enjoy the day you are a wonderful person to your great time to take the fun and take a great time and enjoy the great day you will be a wonderful time for your parents and kids," his abstract said. Bartneck suspects the conference is not of high academic caliber and will not attend. Bonnie Kristian

11:17 a.m. ET

Speaking at a campaign rally in Fletcher, North Carolina, Friday afternoon, Donald Trump complained about Hillary Clinton's extensive negative ads against him, which he says are full of lies and yet raising the Clinton campaign "billions of dollars." (Counting PAC money, which is legally separate from the official campaign, Clinton has raised just over $1 billion to Trump's $700 million.)

He also chafed at his staff's messaging recommendations, and described his affection for denial. "I won't go into things because my people go crazy," Trump said. "They say, 'Don't be particular, just' — I like to deny things. Like, I like to deny — because — but they say, 'Oh, talk about jobs.' But these things [in Clinton's ads] are so false. All of these things, they're so false. They're such lies."

With "Hillary, it’s ad after ad after ad — all paid for by Wall Street and special interests," Trump added, predicting he will win Florida despite Clinton's ad saturation in the state. Watch Trump's comments below. Bonnie Kristian

10:59 a.m. ET
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The two Minneapolis, Minnesota, police officers responsible for the fatal shooting of Jamar Clark followed proper procedure and will not face disciplinary action, the Minneapolis police department chief said Friday.

An internal investigation ruled the officers were in the right when they used deadly force against the 24-year-old black man this past November. "We're disappointed, of course," said the Clark family attorney, Albert Goins. "But we're somewhat flabbergasted by that because I know the standard is fairly low to have…an officer incur discipline."

The circumstances of Clark's death were much debated and the subject of Black Lives Matter protests last fall. The officers were attempting to arrest Clark for interfering with paramedics' treatment of a woman, at which point one of the cops says Clark tried to take and use his gun, provoking the officers' escalation as a means of self defense. Bonnie Kristian

10:21 a.m. ET
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Islamic State militants rounded up and murdered 284 men and boys on Thursday and Friday in Mosul, Iraq, an intelligence source told CNN, as Iraqi and American forces continue to make their approach to retake the town. Mosul is the last major city ISIS controls in Iraq, and those killed in this mass slaughter were previously used as human shields by ISIS terrorists attempting to retain territory in the area. CNN's source says all the victims were shot and buried in a mass grave at a former university.

On Saturday, U.S. Secretary of Defense Ash Carter made an unannounced visit to Iraq to monitor Mosul's progress. Carter's trip marks the sixth day of the campaign and includes plans to meet with Iraqi officials to assess the situation.

In better news greeting the secretary on the ground, Iraqi forces on Saturday successfully reclaimed a village outside Mosul that is predominantly populated by Iraq's persecuted Christian minority. The village was under ISIS control since 2014.

For more on the Mosul campaign, read the The Week's rundown of everything you need to know. Bonnie Kristian

8:48 a.m. ET

WikiLeaks said its supporters are responsible for the massive cyberattack Friday which took down numerous major websites, including The New York Times, Twitter, Etsy, Tumblr, Spotify, Comcast, and more. "Mr. Assange is still alive and WikiLeaks is still publishing," the organization wrote to hackers involved in the incident in a tweet Friday afternoon, asking for the widespread denial of service attacks to cease.

Also Friday afternoon, hacktivist groups Anonymous and New World confirmed the tweet's implications, saying they orchestrated the attack as retaliation for the Ecuadorian government's decision to take away internet access from WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange following his site's ongoing release of emails hacked from the Hillary Clinton campaign.

The Department of Homeland Security and the FBI are investigating the attacks. Bonnie Kristian

8:28 a.m. ET
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Democrat Hillary Clinton's campaign headquarters were partially evacuated Friday night after a mailed envelope containing a mysterious white powder was discovered. New York City law enforcement investigated the substance and determined it was not hazardous, though its exact nature has not been released.

The investigation is now ongoing and the sender has yet to be identified. None of the four campaign staffers who had contact with the powder have reported any symptoms of illness.

Shortly after the 9/11 attacks in 2001, similar envelopes of white powder mailed to multiple locations around the United States were found to contain spores of anthrax, a potentially deadly bacteria. Bonnie Kristian

8:09 a.m. ET
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Republican Donald Trump will give a major speech in historic Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, Saturday morning to lay out his plans for his first 100 days in office if elected president. An advance copy of the speech was not released, but campaign staff said it would be a "very specific, detailed vision" for "economic and physical security," introducing new policy details as Election Day nears.

One Trump aide compared the speech to the 1994 GOP "Contract with America." Rival Hillary Clinton could not make a similar presentation because she "doesn't have a governing vision for America because she has no vision," another Trump aide said. "Hillary Clinton, she can't even go there because she doesn't know what check she will get between now and when she would be hypothetically elected."

Also on Saturday, the 11th woman to accuse Trump of sexual misconduct is expected to come forward. Bonnie Kristian

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