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May 19, 2014
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In a nationally televised speech on Monday, South Korean President Park Geun Hye bowed deeply before her country and took "ultimate responsibility" for the failed rescue of at least 286 young students, crew members, and teachers who died when their ferry sank last month. Park has apologized before, though not so publicly, and already sacked her prime minister. On Monday, she said she will push to disband the Coast Guard, since it "didn't do its duty."

Breaking up the Coast Guard, formed in 1953, requires approval from parliament. Park is proposing to fold the Coast Guard's investigative unit into the national police and create a new agency for the rescue operations. Opposition legislator Min Byung Doo said breaking up the guard is a "wrong diagnosis and prescription" and an exercise in blame-shifting. Korean Maritime and Ocean University professor Choi Suk Yoon tells Bloomberg News that while the maritime agency could use reforming, "disbanding the entire Coast Guard because it has botched rescue operations isn't a very prudent response."

For Park, though — whose approval ratings have dropped sharply since the ferry disaster — canning the Coast Guard is only a first step. More significantly, she pledged to upend South Korea's culture of "kkiri kkiri," a sort of well-greased revolving door between regulators and big business. "The sinking of the Sewol will stay as a hard-to-erase scar in our history," Park said. "It's the duty of the living to make reform and a great transformation for the country so that the sacrifices of the dead were not wasted." Peter Weber

10:22 a.m. ET
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The Square, a Swedish- and English-language comedy, unexpectedly won the biggest award at the 70th Cannes Film Festival, the coveted Palme d'Or. Sofia Coppola was another big winner as she became the second woman in the festival's history to take best director. Coppola won for The Beguiled, a reimagining of a 1971 film based on a novel by Thomas P. Cullinan, about a wounded Union officer in the Civil War who is found by residents of an all-girls boarding school. It stars Nicole Kidman, Kirsten Dunst, Elle Fanning, and Colin Farrell. The first and only other female director to take the honors as best director at Cannes was the Soviet director Yuliya Solntseva, who won in 1961 for her World War II film The Story of the Flaming Years. Harold Maass

9:59 a.m. ET
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North Korea continued a series of controversial weapons tests on Monday with the launch of at least one short-range ballistic missile. The apparent Scud-class ballistic missile flew about 280 miles before coming down in the Sea in Japan's economic zone, South Korean officials said. The launch came after two successful tests of North Korean mid- and long-range missiles in the last two weeks. President Trump responded on Twitter that "North Korea has shown great disrespect for their neighbor, China, by shooting off yet another ballistic missile ... but China is trying hard!"

North Korea's refusal to curb its missile and nuclear weapons programs in defiance of United Nations resolutions and international sanctions has ratcheted up tensions with the U.S. and other nations. The U.S. on Tuesday plans to conduct its first test of a missile defense system intended to intercept ICBMs. Harold Maass

9:30 a.m. ET

On Sunday, German Chancellor Angela Merkel sent a shiver through German-U.S. relations when she told a packed beer tent of her fellow Christian Democrats in Munich that from her experience at the G7 and NATO summits, "I can only say that we Europeans must really take our fate into our own hands — of course in friendship with the United States of America, in friendship with Great Britain, and as good neighbors wherever that is possible also with other countries, even with Russia." On Monday, her spokesman, Steffen Seibert, said Merkel was just being honest about differences with the Trump administration.

"The chancellor's words stand on their own — they were clear and comprehensible," Seibert said. Merkel is "a deeply convinced trans-Atlanticist," he told reporters in Berlin, and "those of you who have reported on the chancellor for a long time will know how important German-American relations are to her." Merkel will "continue to work to strengthen" this "firm pillar of our foreign and security policy," he said, but "because trans-Atlantic relations are so important to this chancellor, it is right from her viewpoint to speak out honestly about differences." President Trump and Merkel disagree on climate change and NATO commitments, among other things.

Merkel, who grew up in Soviet-controlled East Germany, has been a longtime support of the U.S. and backer of strong ties with the U.S., so her comments that Germany's ability to rely on the U.S. and Britain is "over to a certain extent" were seen as a blow to the post-World War II order. David Frump explained on Sunday that splitting apart Germany and the U.S. has been a key, long-term goal of the Soviet Union and then Russia under President Vladimir Putin, and argued that Trump just achieved what Russia has been unable to. "Putin could not have achieved out of this trip more exactly what he wanted if he'd been paying for it," he said. Watch below, or read his longer argument at The Atlantic. Peter Weber

7:57 a.m. ET

On Sunday, Takuma Sato won the 101st Indianapolis 500, beating three-time winner Helio Castroneves by three car lengths in a wild, crash-filled race, with Ed Jones coming in third. Sato, the first Japanese driver to win the Indy 500, is a 40-year-old former Formula One driver who had won just one of his 123 IndyCar races. "Hopefully, the crowd enjoyed it," Sato said "It's beautiful. I dreamed of something like this since I was 12." A number of one-time race leaders were sidelined by seized-up engines and spectacular crashes, the most memorable being Scott Dixon's car being thrown through the air after being by by Jay Howard's car. There was a lot of destruction but no serious injuries in the race. You can watch the Howard-Dixon crash, with ESPN commentary, below. Peter Weber

May 28, 2017

Defense Secretary James Mattis warned of grave consequences for failure to resolve the United States' differences with North Korea via diplomacy while speaking on CBS Sunday.

"A conflict with North Korea would probably be the worst kind of fighting in most people's lifetimes," Mattis said in a Face the Nation interview. "This regime is a threat to the region, to Japan, to South Korea. And in the event of war, they would bring danger to China and to Russia as well," he added. "But the bottom line is it would be a catastrophic war if this turns into a combat if we're not able to resolve this situation through diplomatic means." Pyonyang claimed to test an anti-aircraft missile Sunday morning, its third weapons test in as many weeks.

In the same conversation, Mattis described pursuing a more aggressive approach to the fight against the Islamic State. "The bottom line is we are going to move in an accelerated and reinforced manner, throw them on their back foot. We have already shifted from attrition tactics where we shove them from one position to another in Iraq and Syria, to annihilation tactics where we surround them," he said. Watch an excerpt of his comments below. Bonnie Kristian

May 28, 2017
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A man named Willie Cory Godbolt confessed Sunday to fatally shooting eight people in three homes in the towns of Brookhaven and Bogue Chitto, Mississippi. Among the dead was a sheriff’s deputy called to investigate after a neighbor reported a disturbance. The identities of the victims have not been released.

"I ain't fit to live, not after what I done," Godbolt confessed to a local paper after he was arrested. "Not in y'all eyes, not in nobody else's eyes." Godbolt said he did not intend to hurt the deputy — "My pain wasn't designed for him. He was just there" — but planned to provoke police into killing him: "Suicide by cop was my intention."

A 16-year-old boy Godbolt took hostage escaped unharmed, and law enforcement are expected to bring charges soon. Godbolt is believed to have been disputing custody of his children when he attacked. Bonnie Kristian

May 28, 2017
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"The times in which we could completely depend on others are on the way out," German Chancellor Angela Merkel said Sunday in Munich in comments understood to reference Europe's reliance on the United States. "I've experienced that in the last few days," she continued. "We Europeans truly have to take our fate into our own hands" and "fight for our own destiny."

When President Trump met with fellow NATO leaders in Brussels on Thursday, he reiterated his critique that allies are too dependent on the United States, calling their failure to make meet a pledged 2 percent of GDP defense spending target unfair to the U.S.

Meanwhile, Defense Secretary James Mattis on Sunday maintained Trump is supportive of the alliance. "I think when President Trump chooses to go to NATO personally and stand there alongside the other more than two dozen nations in NATO, that was his statement, not words, actions," he said in a CBS interview. Bonnie Kristian

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