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April 10, 2014
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Fox News surely helped boost the Tea Party to prominence, giving it ample air time back in the early years of the Obama presidency. And as Tea Party-aligned lawmakers moved into Congress, squabbling with the GOP establishment and opening a divisive rift within the party — see: government shutdown — many pinned some of the blame for the budding civil war on the network itself.

In a new interview with Fortune, NewsCorp chief Rupert Murdoch — whose media empire includes Fox News — says the criticism is way off base. On the contrary, he argues that Fox has helped the modern GOP.

I think it has absolutely saved it. It has certainly given voice and hope to people who didn't like all that liberal championing thrown at them on CNN. By the way, we don't promote the Tea Party. That's bullshit. We recognize their existence. [Fortune]

The Tea Party's existence, though, is an increasingly tenuous one. Polls have shown support for the movement dwindling, and the party establishment is finally pushing back against it, with GOP leadership and traditional donors trying to squelch insurgent campaigns early this election year.

On another subject entirely, Murdoch offered this somewhat surprising tidbit about the 2016 election: He "could live with Hillary as president."

"We have to live with who we get," he said. "We don't have any choice."

Read the whole interview (paywall) here. Jon Terbush

10:16 p.m. ET

Donald Trump's solution for improving race relations between black communities and police was summed up with three words: "law and order." He again suggested at Monday's Hofstra University debate that police reinstate "stop and frisk." "Stop and frisk was ruled unconstitutional in New York, largely because it largely singled out black and Hispanic young men," Lester Holt said. "No, you're wrong." Donald Trump responded. "It went before a judge, who was a very against-police judge," he argued, and New York Mayor Bill de Blasio declined to appeal.

Stop-and-frisk was was ruled unconstitutional, as Merriam-Webster points out.

Et tu, Webster's? Peter Weber

10:05 p.m. ET
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During Monday's debate, Donald Trump defended his decision to not pay some contractors who worked for him on different projects.

Hillary Clinton told Trump she has met with dishwashers, painters, glass and marble installers, and other contractors who were "stiffed by you and your businesses." An architect that Clinton said designed the clubhouse for one of Trump's golf courses was in the audience at Hofstra University, and although the man built a "beautiful facility that was immediately put to use," Trump wouldn't pay him.

"Maybe he didn't do a good job and I was unsatisfied with his work," Trump interjected. Clinton said the workers deserved "some kind of apology from someone who has taken their labor, taken the goods they produced, then refused to pay them," adding that she was "relieved" her late father never did business with Trump. Trump responded by saying he does pay contractors and his "obligation right now is to do well for myself, my family, my employees, for my companies, and that's what I do." Trump added that he has plenty of workers who are "unbelievably happy and love me," then used the remainder of his time to plug his new hotel near the White House. "If I don't get there one way," he vowed, "I'll get to Pennsylvania Avenue another." Catherine Garcia

9:48 p.m. ET

At Monday's debate at Hofstra University, Donald Trump blamed Hillary Clinton for her husband's signing of NAFTA, saying she has ruined the economy over the past 30 years, when she was a first lady, senator, and secretary of state, and he also said she has been fighting the Islamic State "for your entire adult life." Clinton at one point quipped, "I have a feeling that by the end of the evening, I will be blamed for everything that's ever happened." Trump jumped in: "Why not?" "Why not, yeah, why not?" Clinton responded, laughing. "Just join the debate by saying more crazy things." Peter Weber

9:37 p.m. ET
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Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump got into their first heated exchange of the presidential debate in a fiery clash over the North American Free Trade Agreement. "You approved NAFTA," Trump interrupted Clinton, "which is the single worst trade deal ever approved."

Trump continued to charge Clinton and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, over NAFTA, to which Clinton snapped, "Donald, I know you live in your own reality, but that is not the facts."

But Trump wasn't letting anything go. Watch the candidates lock horns, below. Jeva Lange

Jeva Lange

9:34 p.m. ET

Hillary Clinton didn't wait too long during Monday night's debate to use earlier comments made by Donald Trump during the Great Recession against him.

Trump, she said, was one of the "people who rooted for the housing crisis." In 2006, Clinton continued, Trump said, "'Gee, I hope it does collapse, because then I can go in and buy some and make some money.' Well, it did collapse." She was interrupted by Trump, who embraced his remarks, saying, "That's called business, by the way." Clinton finished her statement by reminding the audience that "nine million people lost their jobs, five million lost their homes, and $13 trillion in family wealth was wiped out" during the Great Recession. Catherine Garcia

9:28 p.m. ET

From the beginning of Monday's presidential debate, Hillary Clinton has referred to her Republican rival, Donald Trump, as "Donald." Trump, at least in the first few minutes, made a show of referring to Clinton as "Secretary Clinton." In a response about NAFTA, Trump said "Secretary Clinton — yes, is that okay? I want you to be very happy. It's very important to me."

Later, he called her "Hillary." Peter Weber

9:21 p.m. ET

Hillary Clinton wants to get a rise out of Donald Trump at the presidential debate, and she plans to do so ... by calling him by his name. "Mrs. Clinton is eager to play offense and try to get under [Trump's] skin, by doing things like calling him 'Donald' and questioning his net worth," The New York Times reported last week.

And calling him Donald she certainly is. "How are ya, Donald?" Clinton asked her opponent as soon as they walked out on stage.

Trump, for his part, is apparently calling Clinton "Secretary Clinton" — for now. Jeva Lange

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