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April 3, 2014

An off-duty TSA worker saw a woman fall onto the tracks of Chicago's 'L' train on Wednesday, and immediately went into action.

The man, identified by DNAinfo Chicago as Eddie Palacios, 50, jumped down to the inbound tracks at the Blue Line's Chicago Avenue stop and began waving his arms to stop the train that was arriving. He was wearing a bright orange University of Illinois jacket and thought that the vivid color would attract attention. It worked; the train was able to stop before it reached the woman, and she was lifted back up to the platform by several bystanders.

Witnesses are unsure how the woman fell onto the tracks; she was overheard telling a passenger that she slipped, while others told DNAinfo that she smelled of alcohol. After the incident, Palacios boarded a train to his workplace, O'Hare Airport, where he told only his supervisor about what happened.

"As long as I was feeling good that I did something, I didn't think anybody needed to know," he told DNAinfo. "Even when I went to work, people found out just recently, before I left, they said to me, 'How come you didn't say anything?' I said, 'Well, the only person I have to answer to is my wife.' She's the only one I talk to and everybody else is secondary. Because I didn't do it to brag about it or anything because there was nothing to brag. I was just worried about the person more than anyone else." --Catherine Garcia

11:13 a.m. ET
AHMAD GHARABLI/AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. will reportedly move its embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem much sooner than previously anticipated.

Last month, Vice President Mike Pence told Israeli lawmakers that the move would occur by the end of 2019, but Israel's Channel 10 News reports that the date has been moved up to May 14, which marks the 70th anniversary of Israel's declaration of independence. The White House has yet to confirm the development, though Axios cited an anonymous U.S. official in its report.

Citing unnamed Israeli officials, Axios explains that the relocated embassy will first operate as an "interim embassy" at the U.S.'s consular annex in Jerusalem until the State Department decides on a new permanent location. Earlier Friday, The Associated Press reported that the State Department was considering paying for "some or all of the [new] embassy costs" via donations from Republican donors, including pro-Israel billionaire donor Sheldon Adelson.

The U.S. announced in December that it would recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital and move its embassy to the contested city. Israeli lawmakers applauded the decision, but the announcement sparked immediate pushback from Arab states as Palestinians also lay claim to Jerusalem and say it should be their capital in a future state. Kelly O'Meara Morales

9:57 a.m. ET

"Who loves mass shootings?"

CNN's Alisyn Camerota posed the improbable question to NRA spokeswoman Dana Loesch on Friday, one day after Loesch declared at the Conservative Political Action Conference that "[many] in legacy media love mass shootings." Loesch additionally accused the media of milking "crying white mothers" for TV ratings, just one week after 17 people were killed in a mass shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida.

After reading Loesch's quote back to her, Camerota asked: "Why would you make a statement like that?" The NRA spokeswoman replied: "Because it's true." Loesch claimed that she was not referring to everyone in the media — "I said 'many,' not 'all'" — and pointed to "wall-to-wall coverage" of the shootings, claiming that TV networks give more air time to the perpetrators of mass shootings than to the survivors.

"It's just malicious, actually, that you would say that," Camerota retorted. "I don't know anybody in the media who likes mass shootings. You're wrong on every single level. We pray that there's never another one." Loesch tried to get a word in, but Camerota continued: "Guess what? [Mass shootings] are not ratings gold because Americans have reached saturation level," she said. "It's so heartbreaking that they actually often turn away, and we still have the conversation trying to find solutions."

"You're saying that it's malicious, but yet on your network, you've allowed [gun owners] to be indicted as child-murderers," Loesch replied. Watch the tense exchange below. Kelly O'Meara Morales

9:41 a.m. ET

The second day of the 2018 Conservative Political Action Conference has begun, with President Trump set to speak at 10:05 a.m. ET. The gathering in National Harbor, Maryland, is one of the biggest events of the year for conservative activists, with attendance known to top 10,000 people.

Following Trump's speech is a panel on "the new Trump Doctrine" at 11:15 a.m.; a conversation between White House counselor Kellyanne Conway and the administrator of the Small Business Administration, Linda McMahon, at 11:55 a.m.; a speech by Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai at 12:30 p.m.; and a talk by British pro-Trump politician Nigel Farage at 3:35 p.m.

See the full schedule here and watch CPAC live below. Jeva Lange

9:26 a.m. ET
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Because tipplers and java fiends need good news, too, a new study from the University of California, Irvine, has found that drinking alcohol and coffee increases your chance of living past 90 by a statistically significant amount. The university's 90+ Study has followed about 1,700 nonagenarians since 2003, and those "who drank moderate amounts of alcohol or coffee lived longer than those who abstained." "Moderate" means two glasses of beer or wine and two cups of coffee, which decrease your chances of premature death by 18 percent (alcohol) and 10 percent (coffee).

"I have no explanation for it, but I do firmly believe that modest drinking improves longevity," study lead researcher Dr. Claudia Kawas said at an American Association for the Advancement of Science conference in Austin last weekend. But there's good news for more than just beverage aficionados in the study. "People who were overweight in their 70s lived longer than normal or underweight people did," the study found, even if the difference was just 3 percent. People with a hobby were 21 percent less likely to die early, and — sorry — exercising 15-45 minutes a day also reduced premature death chances by 11 percent.

So, pick your poison — in this case, a moderate amount may extend your life. Peter Weber

9:08 a.m. ET

Do you ever stop and wonder, "What's Gary Johnson up to?" If it doesn't happen to be one of the two days a year he is being mobbed by fans at the Conservative Political Action Conference, then there is one probable answer: He's skiing.

Once upon a time, before serving as the governor of New Mexico and long before his Aleppo moment, Johnson even had aspirations to be a ski racer, Esquire reports. Since losing the 2016 election, he hasn't done much more than ski, actually. Last year, Johnson spent more than 100 days on the mountain, whether in Sun Valley, Jackson Hole, or Lake Louise.

It doesn't look like he plans to slow down anytime soon. "After CPAC, he has no immediate plans beyond skiing," Esquire writes. Watch Gary Johnson rip up the slope below. Jeva Lange

8:38 a.m. ET

President Trump has made a determined push for arming school teachers after the Parkland, Florida, shooting last week, but voters appear divided on the issue, a new CBS News poll reveals. Half of Americans, 50 percent, are opposed to arming teachers, while 44 percent are in favor of the plan, the poll found.

"If you had a teacher who was adept at firearms, they could very well end the attack very quickly," the president said during a listening session at the White House on Wednesday. American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten blasted the idea: "Teachers don't want to be armed, we want to teach," she said.

Sixty-five percent of Americans say gun laws should be stricter, up 8 points since December due to mounting support by Republicans and independents. Forty-one percent of Republicans said they would follow Trump's lead if he called for stricter laws, as he has suggested.

Overall, 87 percent of Americans want the country to spend more money on mental health screenings, 75 percent want to strengthen background checks, 56 want to ban bump stocks, and 53 percent want a nationwide ban on the AR-15, making arming teachers the least popular of the ideas being mulled.

The poll reached 1,012 adults nationwide between Feb. 20 and 22. The margin of error is plus or minus 4 points. See the full results here. Jeva Lange

8:07 a.m. ET

President Trump will speak at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference on Friday, although his vision and voice were strongly felt throughout the first day of events Thursday in speeches by Vice President Mike Pence, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas), and NRA CEO Wayne LaPierre. Conservative commentator Ben Shapiro was one of the lone voices of criticism, hitting Trump for "his repeated untruths, which earned some applause," observed Tom Kludt for Reliable Sources.

Trump is set to speak at 10:05 a.m. ET, and his message will be "a test of whether or not the conference can move on from the issue that gripped most of the day on Thursday — responding to last week's shooting at a Parkland, Florida, high school that killed 17 people," NPR reports. Watch a live stream here. Jeva Lange

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