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October 17, 2012

Are you the owner of a brainy chicken who can only relax and lay an egg while perusing A Remembrance of Things Past? Well, Nieman Marcus is here to cater to the needs of even the fussiest of hens. The Heritage Hen Mini Farm ($100,000) is a "multilevel dwelling" that features a nesting room, broody room, living room, chandelier, and even a library. (The library comes stocked with chicken and gardening books, not Proust.) Geez, says Sarah Miller at Grist. "Of all the things you could have given to the chickens who inhabit this manse," Nieman Marcus has decided that "what chickens really want to do is read."  The Week Staff

8:12 a.m. ET

The National Park Service turns 100 years old on Thursday, and one of its goals for its second century is to attract more tourists of color to the 131,000 square miles of parks, monuments, and other public landmarks it manages. This isn't just a matter of diversity for diversity's sake or "this land is your land" idealism, say Felicia Fonseca and Beatriz Costa-Lima at The Associated Press. The U.S. is expected to be majority minority by 2050, and the National Park Service sees broadening its tourist base as an existential challenge.

"If public lands aren't telling their story, and they don't see themselves reflected in these beautiful places, they may not support them," Interior Secretary Sally Jewell tells AP. "They may not recognize that these are their assets and protect them for future generations." Studies commissioned by the National Park Service suggest that about 75 percent of park visitors are white, and there are several reasons minorities don't visit in proportionate number.

For black communities, there's not a strong tradition of visiting national parks, due in part to historic exclusion, says Myron F. Floyd, a scholar at North Carolina State University. Jose Gonzales, the founder of Latino Outdoors, says many Latinos don't know the national parks exist or have no transportation to get to them. Many Asian Americans, meanwhile, face language barriers at national parks or don't like to travel outside their ethnic enclaves, according to Mark Masaoka at the Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council. You can see what the National Park Service plans to do about it, and be reminded of how beautiful some of the national treasures are, in the video below. Peter Weber

8:01 a.m. ET
Keystone/Getty Images

Truman Capote fans will soon have the chance to bring a piece of the writer home with them — literally. On September 24, Capote's ashes will go up for auction in Los Angeles, for a starting price of $2,000. The ashes are expected to sell for upwards of $6,000.

The author of In Cold Blood and Breakfast at Tiffany's died 32 years ago, but the keeper of his ashes, Joanne Carson, the wife of former Tonight Show host Johnny Carson, died last year. The ashes are part of her estate. Joanne was a close friend of Capote's, and the writer often lived and worked at her and her husband's home in Los Angeles until he died there in 1984.

While it might seem kind of macabre to auction off a dead man's ashes, some suspect this would've been right up Capote's alley. "In this case it's absolutely fine because it really embodies what Truman Capote was and what he loved to do," Darren Julien, president of Julien's Auctions, told The Guardian. "Truman told Joanne that he didn't want his ashes to sit on a shelf. So this is a different way of honoring his request. It is just furthering the adventures of Truman Capote." Becca Stanek

7:32 a.m. ET

The world's biggest pearl might have been discovered nearly a decade ago, but no one knew about it until now. That's because the Filipino fisherman who found the treasure hid it under his bed for 10 years as a good luck charm and didn't tell anyone about it, The Independent reports. His relatives eventually brought it to authorities.

(Aileen Cynthia Maggay-Amurao/Facebook)

The pearl measures an incredible 12 inches by 26.4 inches in size. It weighs a mind-blowing 75 pounds; the next largest pearl in the world weighs just 14 pounds.

While the pearl is confirmed to have come from a giant clam, if verified as authentic by international gemologists, it will be worth over an estimated $100 million. Jeva Lange

7:18 a.m. ET

The Washington Post's Aaron Blake says that Donald Trump appears to be "considering his biggest flip-flop yet," pivoting on his signature issue, immigration, while Slate's Jim Newell argues that Trump's "flip-flop" — in recent remarks on Fox News, Trump says he is "softening" his immigration positions, and would mostly follow President Obama's policies, "perhaps with a lot more energy," except he will eject the "bad" immigrants "so fast your head will spin" — is nothing more than a shuffling of adjectives and adverbs with nothing underneath. But what seems clear is that Trump's pledge to deport all 11 million illegal immigrants is, at least for now, off the table.

Given that building "the wall" — still in Trump's speeches — and cracking down on illegal immigrants are so central to Trump's campaign, won't his supporters be dismayed at this Clintonian triangulation? NBC's Katy Tur asked Trump voters outside a rally if they would still support Trump if he abandoned his deportation push, didn't build the wall, or even came up with some sort of amnesty. Their answers: Yup. Watch below. Peter Weber

5:54 a.m. ET
Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images

Early Wednesday, Turkish-backed Syrian rebels and Turkish tanks and minesweepers crossed into Syria in a campaign to push the Islamic State out of the border town Jarablus, one of ISIS's last strongholds on the Turkey-Syria border, Turkey's Anadolu news agency reports. The offensive, backed by U.S. warplanes and advised by U.S. special operations forces, is aimed at shutting off ISIS's supply route to its de facto capital, Raqqa. Turkey has been shelling ISIS positions around Jarablus for two days to prepare for the push, and its forces crossed into Syria hours before U.S. Vice President Joe Biden lands in Ankara to meet with Turkish leaders to smooth over tensions that arose during Turkey's recent failed coup.

This is Turkey's first major offensive against ISIS, and The Wall Street Journal suggests three reasons why the country is getting involved now: Ankara wants to demonstrate that its military is still strong after the post-coup purge of officers; retaliation for the suspected ISIS suicide bombing of a wedding on Saturday; and to prevent Kurdish fighters, who have been successfully pushing ISIS back for months now, from claiming the town for themselves, thus gaining more territory along the Turkish border. Turkey reluctantly allowed Kurdish fighters to take part in the offensive, The Journal reports, with the expectation they will leave the town after ISIS is outside.

Turkish officials were quoted by Anadolu as saying the Jarablus operation "is aimed at clearing the Turkish borders of terrorist groups, helping to enhance border security and supporting the territorial integrity of Syria." Peter Weber

5:06 a.m. ET

Former New York City mayor and gleeful Donald Trump advocate Rudy Giuliani is pushing conspiracy theories about Hillary Clinton's health, recently telling the Fox News audience to google Hillary Clinton and health for themselves, Stephen Colbert noted on Tuesday's Late Show. "Giuliani says just diagnose Hillary on the internet, because if it's on the internet, you know it's true," he said. "For instance, I put my symptoms into WebMD and found out — I have started menopause."

"I'm not surprised he was able to diagnose Hillary Clinton so accurately without, you know, examining her," Colbert said. "After all, Giuliani and Donald Trump are experts on female anatomy." He wasn't going where you think — yet — but rather bringing up an old video Trump and Giuliani made together. "Obviously, that's shocking, and you're going to want to verify that video," he said. "So just go online and put down 'Donald Trump Rudy Giuliani Drag Queen Motorboat'" — and if you don't get the motorboat part, Colbert acted it out — a few times.

"But here's the thing — I just want to say this to the Trump people out there," Colbert said. "I don't know why they keep saying things like 'frail' or 'weak' or 'low energy' — you're just tiptoeing around the medical condition that you're really upset about, one that she has that no other president in history has ever faced: Hillary Clinton has chronic no-penis."

The rest of Colbert's monologue dipped into slightly uncomfortable sex-internet stuff, but he also hit at the #HillaryHealth conspiracies in his cold open, and this really is good clean family fun. Peter Weber

4:20 a.m. ET

On Tuesday's Late Show, Stephen Colbert sighed over the news that the State Department will release 15,000 new Hillary Clinton emails before the November election. "That is ridiculous," he said. "I have thousands of unread emails on my own inbox, and now I have to read 15,000 of hers?" The new batch of Clinton emails center around her "ties to donors at what's called the Clinton Foundation," he explained, "which is a charity set up to distribute aid around the world and, just as importantly, to keep Bill Clinton busy enough that he doesn't spend all day trying to get the Secret Service to go to Hooters with him."

"But with all the questions surrounding all of these emails, it's hard to tell what's really a thing and what's nothing at all," Colbert said. To figure it out, he brought out a Late Show "Thing-O-Meter." Some emails — like Bono/NASA — were not a thing but merited a U2 joke, while the fact that Bill Clinton appears to think the Clinton Foundation ties are a thing is a real thing in itself. Colbert ended up with a quip about bald men with ponytails, and you can see if that's really a thing below. Peter Weber

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