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August 9, 2018

On Fox News Wednesday night, Laura Ingraham took issue with comments by "new socialist 'it' girl" Alexandria Ocasia-Cortez. Ingraham defended minivans against a perceived slight and asked how Ocasio-Cortez knows about America "from her loft in Queens" — and then she went full nativist.

"In some parts of the country, it does seem like the America that we know and love doesn't exist anymore," Ingraham said. "Massive demographic changes have been foisted upon the American people. And they're changes that none of us ever voted for and most of us don't like." She specifically cited "both illegal and in some cases legal immigration."

"This is exactly what socialists like Ocasio-Cortez want," Ingraham argued: "Eventually diluting and overwhelming your vote with the votes of others who aren't, uh let's face it, too big on Adam Smith and the Federalist Papers." Journalist Jeff Bercovici joked that Ingraham had a point.

On CNN, Chris Cuomo offered a rebuttal. President Trump "doesn't want immigrants coming in any more than absolutely necessary," he said. "What he really wants to create is an ugly rejection of who made this country great in the first place. And you are staring at the big nose of the truth on your screen right now," he said, pointing to the proof of his Italian heritage. "So my argument is this: How many of you would be here if America was like what Trump wants it to be now? I wouldn't. Would you? ... I don't think you'd make the cut." Peter Weber

9:30a.m.

Game 1 of the 2018 World Series is just hours away.

The best-of-seven series between the Boston Red Sox and Los Angeles Dodgers — two of the most storied franchises in Major League Baseball — is sure to be compelling. Clayton Kershaw, arguably the best pitcher of his generation, will start for the Dodgers tonight, facing off against Red Sox ace Chris Sale. The game starts at 8:09 p.m. ET.

Here are a few compelling numbers to help get you excited for this historic series.

102 — Years since the Red Sox and the Dodgers last faced off in the World Series. At the time — 1916! — the Dodgers were known as the Brooklyn Robins.

30 — Years since the Dodgers last won the World Series.

3 — Times the Red Sox have won the World Series since 2004, last doing so in 2013. Prior to 2004, the Red Sox hadn't won since 1918.

8 - Years since the Dodgers last played at Fenway Park.

50 — Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit, expected at Fenway Park during Game 1, although temperatures could drop into the 40s.

108 — Wins the Red Sox racked up during the regular season, 16 more than the Dodgers. This was a franchise record for the Red Sox.

$29 million — How much more expensive the Red Sox's payroll is than the Dodgers; the Red Sox lead the MLB with $228.4 million, while the Dodgers come in third with $199.6 million.

$74 — Money you'd win if you successfully bet $100 on the Red Sox to win the World Series.

$115 — Money you'd win if you successfully bet $100 on the Dodgers to win the World Series.

1 - Supposed belly-button ring infection that kept Chris Sale from his last start in the American League Championship Series.

1 - Throat-slashing gesture made by fiery Dodgers star Yasiel Puig after belting a three-run homer in Game 7 of the National League Championship Series. He also engaged in multiple "crotch chops."

Should be a fun series. Let's play ball! Brendan Morrow

8:50a.m.

The Mega Millions lottery jackpot has reached a record $1.6 billion ahead of Tuesday night's drawing. The semi-weekly prize has been ballooning since July 24, and had reached $1 billion ahead of Friday night's drawing, when, again, nobody picked all six winning numbers. It is likely someone will win on Tuesday, as 75 percent of the 302 million possible combinations will be chosen by then, based on sales projections. Roughly 57 percent of the combinations had been chosen before Friday's drawing. "Mega Millions has already entered historic territory, but it's truly astounding to think that now the jackpot has reached an all-time world record," said Gordon Medenica, lead director of the Mega Millions Group and director of Maryland Lottery and Gaming. Harold Maass

8:38a.m.

WWE's Raw became all too real Monday night.

At the beginning of the weekly live wrestling show, star Roman Reigns came out to the ring and dropped his fictional persona to make a stunning announcement: He is battling leukemia and will be relinquishing his Universal Championship. The Universal Championship is the WWE's top title, and Reigns had for the past few years been pushed as the face of the wrestling enterprise. He was set to defend his title at the upcoming Crown Jewel pay-per-view event.

Reigns also revealed on the show that he was originally diagnosed with leukemia when he was 22. "I've been living with leukemia for 11 years and unfortunately it's back," he told the crowd. Reigns had never previously discussed a battle with leukemia publicly. Now, he said, he'll be leaving to focus on his health, although he promised fans that he's not retiring and will be returning after he beats cancer a second time. Reigns is typically a controversial figure in the wrestling world, but this segment ended with the live crowd erupting in applause and chanting "Thank you, Roman." After he got out of the ring, his co-workers embraced him in tears.

Watch Reigns' emotional announcement below. Brendan Morrow

7:35a.m.

There are wealthy Democrats throwing money at the 2018 midterms, on track to be the most expensive election in U.S. history, but nobody in either party comes close to Republican mega-donor Sheldon Adelson and his wife, Miriam. With a recent $25 million donation to the GOP super PAC the Senate Leadership Fund, the Adelsons have now given Republicans $113 million through September to help them hold both houses of Congress, surpassing the $82.6 million the couple spent during the entire 2016 election cycle.

The late cash infusion by Adelson, a casino magnate worth an estimated $33.4 billion, is the "new benchmark for the most any individual household has spent on one election — including campaign committees, parties, and PACs — since the Citizens United Supreme Court decision in 2010," Roll Call reports, citing OpenSecrets data. "The rankings by OpenSecrets do not include donations through 501(c)(4) 'dark money' groups."

Thanks largely to this unprecedented political largesse, Republicans have passed Democrats in cash for the final stretch of the 2018 campaign, CNN reports. The Adelsons contributed two-thirds of the Senate Leadership Fund's haul last month, and a good share of the House GOP super PAC's windfall, too. The Adelson-flush GOP super PACs have at least evened out the advantage individual Democrats had from outraising their GOP rivals in competitive races.

"There's an intensity to these midterm elections that has been boiling since Election Day 2016," says Sheila Krumholz at the Center for Responsive Politics. But the small-donor furor fueling the Democrats "may not matter as much" on Election Day if one or two large Republican donors can make up the difference. That money may not overcome Democratic enthusiasm to vote in House races, but ProPublica has a long look at Adelson's healthy return on investment. Peter Weber

6:20a.m.

In a speech to his ruling Justice and Development Party on Tuesday, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan called Saudi Arabia's acknowledgment that Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi was killed Oct. 2 inside its Istanbul consulate a good first step, but he forcefully disputed the Saudi story that Khashoggi died in a spontaneous fistfight. Saudi officials began planning Khashoggi's "savage murder" in late September, Erdogan said, and a team of three Saudis arrived Oct. 1 to scout a forest, possibly for a place to bury Khashoggi's dismembered remains. He also confirmed that the Saudis used a body double to try and make it seem like Khashoggi left the consulate alive.

Erdogan said the 18 people Saudi Arabia says it has arrested for the murder include the 15 Saudi agents identified by Turkish intelligence plus three consular officials, and he requested that Saudi Arabia let them be tried for their crimes in Istanbul. He also said a Saudi official told him a Turkish co-conspirator may have helped dispose of the body. Erdogan questioned who ordered the assassination, asked what happened to Khashoggi's body, and said he expects all perpetrators to be brought to justice, "from the highest level to the lowest level."

“I do not doubt the sincerity of King Salman," Erdogan said. "That being said, an independent investigation needs to be carried out. This is a political killing." He did not mention Saudi Arabia's de facto ruler, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, the king's son. But the speech carried a strong implication that Erdogan did not believe the crown prince is innocent, says Bethan McKernan, Middle East correspondent for The Guardian. Peter Weber

5:20a.m.

Two weeks before the midterm elections that will determine control of Congress, 52 percent of Republicans told a HillTV/HarrisX poll that they support expanding Medicare to all Americans, a proposal mostly famously promoted by Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.). The other 48 percent of Republicans opposed the idea, the poll found. The 'Medicare for all' idea was unsurprisingly more popular among Democrats (92 percent support) and independents (68 percent support). Overall, 70 percent of Americans supported expanding Medicare to everyone, including 42 percent who strongly favored the idea.

Reid Wilson, a campaign correspondent for The Hill, told HillTV's Joe Concha that this is mostly a messaging problems for Republicans. "This is a debate that has only just started, and there are a lot of Republicans right now who are trying to figure out ways to talk about 'Medicare for all' in ways that will bring that number down, and bring the overall number down," Wilson suggested. "So this is not baked in at all."

The poll could also be an outlier, or it could signal a shift in acceptance for expanding a popular government program to everyone. HarrisX conducted the poll online Oct. 19-20, surveying 1,000 registered voters. It has a sampling margin of error of 3.1 percentage points. Peter Weber

4:33a.m.

The pivotal 2018 elections are in two weeks, "Democrats are presently ahead in the polls, but President Trump is employing the same winning strategy as of 2016: racism and lying," Stephen Colbert said on Monday's Late Show. On both fronts, he said, Trump is trying to paint a huge group of Honduran migrants and their kids as a pack of "criminals and unknown Middle Easterners," a veritable "National Emergy" [sic], as he tweeted Monday. "It's not a dog whistle, that's a dog trombone," Colbert said. "He's just stuffing all the fears into one burrito of doom." He suggest a few ingredients Trump might have missed, including "gay spiders."

"Trump is pulling out all the stops in the midterms to try to avoid the impending blue wave," Seth Meyers said on Monday's Late Night. "And the reason these midterms feel so tense is that right now, millions of Americans feel their democracy isn't working." He pointed to GOP gerrymandering, voter purges, and minority rule. Trump is using that anger to beget more anger.

"People are angry that a minority faction is ruling the country and ignoring what most people want, and they've expressed that anger in various ways, like confronting politicians in public or protesting in the capital," Meyers said. Trump and other Republicans are fancifully calling that "mob violence," and Trump has embraced a catchy rhyme. "When Trump finds a rhyme like 'mobs' and jobs,' that his Gettysburg Address," he sighed. "Meanwhile, there are Republicans who are literally violent," and Trump runs his administration like a "protection racket." You can watch Meyers' case for how Trump is "an actual crime boss" below. Peter Weber

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