Roy Moore's defeat shows partisanship has its limits

In Alabama, GOP voters followed their conscience, not their party

Roy Moore speaks at a rally in Fairhope, Alabama.
(Image credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

How do you elect a Democrat to a Senate seat in the Deep South in 2017?

You do it by running a Republican who's been credibly accused of child predation; who lost his judgeship twice after defying the rulings of higher courts; whose views of religion and sexuality place him on the far rightward fringe of public opinion; who gets himself repudiated by the state's senior senator on the weekend before the election; and who believes that many of America's problems could be fixed by repealing every constitutional amendment passed since the original Bill of Rights was adopted — a change that would, among many other things, remove the abolition of slavery from the Constitution and deprive women of the right to vote.

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