Hydrogen cars are trying to be the next big sustainable vehicle

But questions remain as to whether they can overtake battery-powered electric cars

Photo collage of a hydrogen fuel cell Honda, with two large hydrogen particles and a parking ticket in the background
Though they are not as widespread as battery-powered EVs, hydrogen cars are beginning to gain traction as a viable market option
(Image credit: Illustration by Julia Wytrazek / Getty Images)

While electric vehicles (EVs) are having a moment right now, there is an offshoot product looking to replace the battery-powered EV: hydrogen cars. Unlike traditional EVs, which draw electricity directly from a battery source, hydrogen cars mix hydrogen and oxygen into a fuel cell to produce electricity. Though they are not as widespread as battery-powered EVs, hydrogen cars (sometimes called fuel cell electric vehicles or FCEVs) are beginning to gain traction as a legitimate market option. 

Honda is the latest automaker to make a hydrogen play in the United States, as the company recently announced it would introduce an FCEV this coming spring that also has a battery backup. This makes Honda the first Japanese automaker to bring this type of technology to the market, and other car brands are expected to follow. Both Honda and its competitor Toyota have "embraced hydrogen as one option to reduce emissions," Bloomberg said. 

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