'Germs can, in fact, be good'

Opinion, comment and editorials of the day

A pile of protective face masks in Hong Kong, China.
Mask mandates "reduced children's exposure to a potpourri of germs that strengthen their developing immune systems."
(Image credit: Paul Yeung / Bloomberg / Getty Images)

'Protecting kids from life's troubles leaves them more vulnerable'

Allysia Finley in The Wall Street Journal

It's hardly surprising that Chinese hospitals are suddenly "overwhelmed by sick children," says Allysia Finley in The Wall Street Journal. Respiratory viruses "suppressed by nearly three years of Covid lockdowns" have "come back with a vengeance" amid low "natural immunity." Hospitalization rates are up for young U.S. children, too. That's partly due to "bone-headed" mask mandates that didn't stop Covid but "reduced children's exposure to a potpourri of germs that strengthen their developing immune systems."

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'Holding judges to high ethical standards is essential'

Bloomberg editorial board

The Supreme Court's newly adopted ethics code is an "overdue acknowledgment" that its "justices have exhibited a series of embarrassing ethical lapses," including failing to disclose lavish gifts, says the Bloomberg editorial board. The missteps "stain the court's reputation and reduce public confidence in its authority and independence." But the new rules lack enforcement mechanisms, so they might just "breed more public cynicism." Congress needs to step in with legislation "to hold the justices accountable."

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'The $16 McDonald's meal that struck a nerve'

Allison Morrow at CNN

"Sticker shock" is no longer just a lonely moment of panic for a cash-strapped consumer, says Allison Morrow at CNN. Social media can transform any "unexpectedly high bill" into an invitation for "everyone to publicly shake their fist" at the state of the economy. Take the Idaho guy whose late-2022 post on his $16 McDonald's meal went viral recently. This kind of exaggerated snapshot prevents Democrats from making people see "the economy is actually doing great."

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'The flight of young voters to Trump is a stunning'

A.B. Stoddard at The Bulwark

A second term for former President Donald Trump will "destroy democracy," says A.B. Stoddard in The Bulwark. He "calls for internment camps," and "prosecution for political enemies." But President Joe Biden is having a hard time convincing voters of "the danger of Trump." Biden is losing support while "Trump has never had more." Apparently, Trump's "shock and corruption" has "worn off" with nonwhite, young, and independent voters, who trust him more on the economy and immigration.  

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