The false premise making war with Russia more likely

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Crafting a wise foreign policy requires weighing one's own national interests against those of rivals and adversaries around the world. The comparison with other countries is important because it's only through an informed understanding how they view the world — and our own behavior within it — that we can accurately anticipate how they'll respond to our actions.

If foreign policy writer Peter Beinart is right, the United States struggles mightily with placing ourselves in the shoes of our rivals and adversaries around the world. In a recent Substack post, Beinart calls this one of our "delusions of innocence" — the predisposition of Americans to think well of ourselves and to dismiss the stated concerns of others as rooted in dishonesty or bad faith.

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