Science behind cloning monkeys is helping advance medical research

The first rhesus monkey to be successfully cloned after many failed attempts has raised concerns among animal welfare groups

Photo collage of rhesus monkeys on top of microscope photography of cells
The technique used to create Retro the rhesus monkey builds upon the pioneering work that produced Dolly the sheep in 1996
(Image credit: Illustrated / Getty Images)

Researchers in China have successfully cloned the first rhesus monkey, a species widely used in medical research because of its physiological similarity to humans.

The monkey, named Retro, is now more than three years old and is "doing well and growing strong", according to Falong Lu, one of the authors of the study published in the journal Nature Communications.

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