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October 22, 2015

One big question mark in the recovery from the Great Recession is people who are out of the labor force entirely — they're not employed and they're not looking for work. They've been growing as a portion of the American population since the late 1990s, and spiked after the Great Recession. So everyone's wondering if this shift is permanent, or if a lot of these people can be brought back in.

A new analysis by The Wall Street Journal suggests a fair number of them can.

(Graph courtesy of The Wall Street Journal)

A lot of people dropped out of the labor force either by staying in school or by retiring early. Neither solution is great: more education comes with more student debt, and early retirement means reduced benefits. But they may be the best option for people when jobs are scarce. Obviously, we may run out of time to get early retirees back into the labor market. But a lot of people in school can obviously be brought back in, if we get job growth going again.

Another big story here is the rise of disability as a form of early retirement (in light blue). There's a fair amount of evidence disability benefits have risen to offset the decay of workers' compensation programs. But disability itself is also relative: If you've injured your back and can't do manual labor, but a lackluster economy means there are no desk jobs in your community, or it's too late for you to acquire the skills for a desk job, then you're disabled for all intents and purposes. So this category is at least somewhat amenable to more robust job growth as well.

In short, with the right macroeconomic policies to restore job growth and full employment, there's every reason to think labor force participation can be brought back up. Jeff Spross

12:52p.m.

About 500 Georgians have been told to evacuate their homes after a train carrying propane derailed in their small town.

"Several" railroad cars tipped off the tracks in Byromville, Georgia, which is 55 miles south of Macon, CSX Railroad tells The Associated Press. Some of the cars contained pressurized propane, prompting the county's sheriff to order anyone within half a mile of the incident to evacuate.

That radius contains "practically the whole town" of Byromville, town fire chief Brett Walls tells local CBS affiliate WMAZ. Walls put the number of derailed cars anywhere from 15 to 30, and said the propane that spilled from them was odorless. No injuries have been reported.

Check out the station's footage of the incident below. Kathryn Krawczyk

12:02p.m.

Mass shootings have hit music festivals and movie theaters. They've rocked every level of the education system. They've spared people who've gone on to be killed another day. And now, the names of those lost in America's everyday tragedy have filled a whole page in The Washington Post.

On Saturday, the Post published a scathing piece from its editorial board, condemning how "sadly — maddeningly — Congress has failed to" combat the ever-growing scourge of shootings in America. But below its argument for action was something even more moving: A list of victims who'd been killed in mass shootings since the 1999 attack at Columbine High School. The names filled an entire page in the Post's print edition. And, as the Post noted, the list was surely incomplete. Look at the whole spread below. Kathryn Krawczyk

10:52a.m.

President Trump won't stop proclaiming House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) should be the next Speaker of the House. And Pelosi won't stop waving those endorsements away.

In a Saturday morning tweet, Trump continued his push for Pelosi in a very Trumpian way: Bragging that he could get Pelosi "as many votes as she wants" to become speaker. Trump also called out Rep. Tom Reed (R-N.Y.), a Republican who told The Buffalo News Thursday he's willing to support Pelosi, in his tweet. But when asked about Trump's endorsement — and any possible support from Republicans — Pelosi was not so kind.

Trump's endorsement comes in the wake of yet another incoming House Democrat, this time Virginia's Abigail Spanberger, saying Friday she wouldn't vote for Pelosi to become speaker. She joins 17 other Democrats who've publicly denounced Pelosi's bid, CNN reports. Pelosi met with Spanberger and several other members of her opposition on Friday, including Rep. Marcia Fudge (D-Ohio), who's considering a run against Pelosi for the top role.

Just after Democrats regained the House last week, Trump similarly tweeted that he could throw a few Republican votes her way if Democrats don't pull through. Less surprisingly, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) also tweeted that he "fully support[s]" Pelosi on Saturday morning. And Pelosi seems as confident as ever, with a spokesman telling The Washington Post Saturday that she'll "win the speakership with Democratic votes." Kathryn Krawczyk

9:48a.m.

The Supreme Court has opted to hear arguments over President Trump's administration's decision to add a question of citizenship to the 2020 census.

The question, which would directly ask if "this person a citizen of the United States," has been challenged in six lawsuits around the U.S. This has led to disputes over what evidence can be brought up during the trials, and if Trump officials' motives in enacting the addition can be discussed as well. But the Supreme Court's timing on this decision is "curious," seeing as the controversial census already undergoing one trial in New York, The Washington Post writes.

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross announced the addition in March, originally claiming the Justice Department ordered the move. But documents unveiled in one of the lawsuits later showed Ross talked about adding the question with former Trump strategist Stephen Bannon, suggesting Ross drove the change himself. Ross and other administration officials' motivations for the addition are now slated for discussion in the forthcoming Supreme Court hearing.

The Trump administration has fought to block Ross from facing questioning over the matter, and last month the Supreme Court refused to allow the deposition of Ross in the New York case, per NPR. U.S. District Judge Jesse Furman has scheduled closing arguments in the New York case for Nov. 27, while the Supreme Court has the case slated for next February.

The citizenship question has faced criticism from advocates who say undocumented people will avoid answering the census out of fear. That would lead to undercounts in Democrat-heavy areas, and perhaps cut federal aid that undocumented immigrants in those areas rely on. Kathryn Krawczyk

9:07a.m.

The Camp Fire has left 71 dead and more than 1,000 missing throughout northern California. It's also spread some of the dirtiest air in the world to San Francisco and beyond.

After burning for more than a week, 50 percent of the blaze had been contained as of Friday night, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said. Reports of missing people swelled from more than 600 on Friday to 1011, Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea tells CBS News. Honea also warned the list was "dynamic" and could grow or shrink as those who don't realize they've been reported missing come forward.

Meanwhile, air quality in northern California has reached levels as poor as cities in China and India. It’s nearly impossible to navigate the "apocalyptic fog" surrounding the fire, The New York Times writes, and hospital workers say reports of respiratory complications have surged. Nearly 200 miles south in San Francisco, the city’s iconic trolleys have been pulled from the streets amid smoky air. Residents have taken to wearing respiratory masks, schools have closed, and the so-called "Big Game" between the University of California, Berkeley and Stanford University has been postponed. Kathryn Krawczyk

November 16, 2018

The CIA has "high confidence" that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman ordered the murder of U.S.-based Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, officials first told The Washington Post.

The CIA reportedly drew its evidence from, among other things, a phone call between Khashoggi and bin Salman's brother Khalid bin Salman, in which Khalid told Khashoggi to visit the Saudi consulate where he was killed. The crown prince told Khalid to make the call, per the Post. A team of 15 Saudi operatives then reportedly flew via government airplane to Istanbul for the murder.

The U.S. Treasury Department sanctioned 17 Saudis it said were "involved in" Khashoggi's murder earlier this week. But this is furthest the U.S. has gone toward implicating Saudi Arabia for the crime, per reports from multiple sources.

Khashoggi was killed after entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2, and Turkey has long maintained the Saudi government was responsible. Saudi Arabia once said the murder was a predetermined rogue operation, but shifted to say it was a random killing when announcing charges against 11 alleged perpetrators earlier this week. Bin Salman is close with President Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner, and some have suggested the Trump administration avoided implicating Saudi Arabia to preserve an alliance with the country.

A spokeswoman for America's Saudi consulate told the Post that the CIA's claims in its "purported assessment are false." Kathryn Krawczyk

November 16, 2018

Democrat Stacey Abrams on Friday said that it was not possible for her to win the gubernatorial race in Georgia, admitting defeat against Republican Brian Kemp, who had already declared victory in the hotly contested race, reports NPR.

On Election Day, the race was too close to call, and Abrams accused Kemp of suppressing votes as Georgia's secretary of state in an effort to become governor. "I acknowledge that [Kemp] will be certified the victor in the 2018 gubernatorial elections," Abrams said, saying her remarks were not a concession speech. "Concession means to acknowledge an act is right, true, or proper. ... I cannot concede that." She said she would file a federal lawsuit to contest the "gross mismanagement" of the election. Abrams' campaign has said there was evidence of "misconduct, fraud, or irregularities" that may have been enough "to change or place in doubt the results."

Kemp responded to her speech by applauding her "passion and hard work," but said "we can no longer dwell on the divisive politics of the past" and must "move forward." Watch Abrams' remarks below, via CBS News. Summer Meza

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