Stephen Colbert uses pop culture to explain how Russian trolls helped Trump win with 'real fake news'

Stephen Colbert explains Russian trolls
(Image credit: Late Show)

This week's confirmation vote on President Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Neil Gorsuch, could forever change the Senate. "Democrats aren't going to let Gorsuch get confirmed without a fight — sure, it's a fight they're going to lose, but those are the kind of fights Democrats love," Stephen Colbert explained on Monday's Late Show, looking a bit confused when the audience clapped loudly. Democrats now have enough no votes to filibuster Gorsuch, but if they do, Senate Republicans have threatened to use the "nuclear option," he explained, "which would upset Donald Trump, because he wants to be the first to use the nuclear option, possibly against North Korea, maybe Jake Tapper."

Some people argue that the Senate shouldn't confirm any of Trump's nominees until the end of the investigations into his team's possible collusion with Russia, Colbert said, pivoting fairly seamlessly to new developments on Trump and Russia. "It turns out the most effective thing that Russia did was change public opinion through targeted social media," using 1,000 trolls spreading "fake news" to Americans in key states, Colbert said. "Now, when I say 'fake news,' this is real fake news, not fake fake news that is real news that Donald Trump just doesn't like."

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