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May 20, 2014
Getty Images/PETER MACDIARMID

Not even soccer legend Pele is excited for next month's FIFA World Cup in Brazil. The country's most celebrated athlete recently told a German magazine that he's disgusted with Brazil's lack of preparedness for global spectacle.

"The political situation is difficult. The situation worries me," he told Sport Blid. "There has been sufficient time to bring the stadiums to completion. It's unacceptable. It's a disgrace."

Several of the stadiums have been steeped in construction delays, with three of 12 not even being completed yet. The World Cup is slated to kick off June 12. Jordan Valinsky

1:51 a.m. ET

In Albuquerque on Tuesday, Donald Trump held his first campaign rally in almost two weeks, and he used his speech to criticize Hillary Clinton, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), and Gov. Susana Martinez (R-N.M.), the first Latina GOP governor and current head of the Republican Governors Association. "You've got to get your governor to do a better job," he told the crowd of about 8,000. "She's not doing her job." He added, "Hey, maybe I'll run for governor of New Mexico." Martinez has declined to endorse Trump, and she and other state GOP leaders did not attend the rally.

Trump's rally was interrupted several times by protesters, but the real drama was happening outside the convention center.

Protesters outside the venue threw plastic bottles, burning Donald Trump T-shirts, and rocks at the police, and rushed a police barricade, trying to force their way into the Trump rally. The police fired pepper spray and threw smoke grenades into the scrum. Several Albuquerque police officers were injured by flying rocks, the police department said, and at least on person was "arrested from the riot." A glass door was broken, and the police said it appeared to have been hit by a pellet gun.

This was Trump's first visit to New Mexico. It was not the first violent protest outside a Trump rally. Peter Weber

12:44 a.m. ET

Gwen Sefani is a noted fan of Japanese culture. Her boyfriend, Blake Shelton, had never tried Japan's most famous food. Jimmy Kimmel stepped in on Tuesday's Tonight Show, taking Shelton out for his first sushi dinner. At Nobu, the famous New York sushi restaurant.

They started with sake — it tasted like "Easter egg coloring," Shelton said — then the salmon. "That, right there, looks like a human tongue," Shelton said. And then he ate it: "The texture is play dough, but I will say this to you right now, man to man, I like that. I like how that tasted." That was the high-water mark. If you have never tried sushi before and are nervous, you can take comfort in Shelton's bravery — and if all else fails, you can repeat his refrain: "Hey, can we get some more rice wine?" Peter Weber

May 24, 2016
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Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton won their respective primaries in Washington State on Tuesday, but only Trump gets delegates for his victory. (Democrats allocated their delegates in March caucuses, which Bernie Sanders won.) Trump won at least 27 of the 44 delegates at stake, putting him just 41 delegates shy of clinching the Republican nomination, a formality since he is the only candidate left in the race. Trump and Clinton are expected to wrap up their nominations on June 7, the next and final contest in the 2016 primary season.

With about 70 percent of precincts reporting, Trump has 76 percent of the vote, versus about 10 percent each for Ted Cruz and John Kasich. Clinton is leading Sanders, 54 percent to 46 percent. Peter Weber

May 24, 2016
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The U.S. Department of Justice announced Tuesday it will pursue capital punishment for Dylann Roof, the white man accused of killing nine black churchgoers during a service at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina. The DOJ released a list of reasons why it will seek the death penalty, including Roof's "lack of remorse" and the fact that the killings were "racially-motivated" and "intentional." Roof faces 33 federal charges from the June 2015 incident, including hate crimes and obstruction of religion. Kimberly Alters

May 24, 2016
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After over a decade of forcing users to get creative within its strict 140-character parameters, Twitter's now-ingrained length limit is getting ever-so-slightly more lenient. On Tuesday, the social network announced that media attachments such as photos and GIFs will no longer count toward the character limit, a game-changer that allows users to incorporate more multimedia into individual tweets without sacrificing precious room for text.

User handles, which are designated by an "@" symbol, will also be exempt from the character count, and tweets beginning with a handle will no longer vanish from users' timelines as they currently do. This relieves the Twitterverse of an odd makeshift trick wherein users place a period before the @ sign in order to make a tweet appear on their main timeline:

In what has surely been a source of stress for Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, the 140-character limit is both what makes the platform unique and an impediment to its growth. Twitter has struggled to attract new users after growth began to level off in 2009, in part because potential newbies are turned off by the difficult prospect of choosing their words carefully to abide by the length limit. Meanwhile, loyal Tweeters have embraced the limit as a necessary cap on the enormous volume of text published on the site — so fervently so that initial reports back in January that Dorsey planned to significantly alter the limit were met with outrage. At the very least, if users find themselves frustrated by even this more minor change, they'll have more room on Twitter to vent their frustrations in GIF form. Roxie Pell

May 24, 2016

In 1993, then-Deputy White House Counsel Vince Foster committed suicide in Virginia's Fort Marcy Park — at least, that's according to six separate investigations of the incident. The death of Foster, who was a friend of Bill and Hillary Clinton's, has been fodder for years for conspiracy theorists positing the Clintons somehow had Foster killed because he possessed incriminating knowledge about the couple's affairs. Still, multiple official investigations ruled the death a suicide.

Of course, that didn't deter Donald Trump from calling the circumstances surrounding Foster's death "very fishy" in an interview with The Washington Post, which was published Monday. Trump has been ramping up his attacks on Hillary Clinton and her family in recent weeks as he pivots to the general election, and he has been forthright about his intent to use ad hominem attacks against her. But CNN's Jake Tapper took issue with Trump's repetition of a "fiction born of delusion and un-tethered to reality," calling Trump's comments "shameful." Watch Tapper's whole takedown, which aired Tuesday on his show The Lead, below. Kimberly Alters

Kimberly Alters

May 24, 2016
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The National Football League announced host cities for the 2019 through 2021 Super Bowls on Tuesday. Next year's Super Bowl LI will be held in Houston, it was announced in 2013, while in 2014 the league decided to send 2018's Super Bowl LII to Minneapolis. Today's announcement reveals Super Bowl LIII will take place in Atlanta in 2019, Super Bowl LIV in Miami in 2020, and Super Bowl LV in Los Angeles in 2021.

Several of the games will be held in entirely new stadiums: The 53rd championship game, in Atlanta, will be in the yet-to-be-constructed Mercedes-Benz Stadium, and Minneapolis' U.S. Bank Stadium is only expected to open this fall. The 2021 Los Angeles game brings the championship back to the site of Super Bowl I and will be played in the Los Angeles Rams' proposed stadium in Inglewood. Jeva Lange

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