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April 30, 2014
U.S. Library of Congress

Federal prosecutors are preparing to file criminal charges against at least two of the world's largest banks, The New York Times reports, tackling the "public outcry over the perception that Wall Street giants are 'too big to jail.'" That perception is due largely to the fact that five years after the global economy collapsed under the weight of shady mortgage and lending practices at the world's biggest banks, no top bank or banker has been charged with a crime.

So who are the feds going after? Switzerland's Credit Suisse and France's BNP Paribas, according to The Times' sources. Now, both banks operate in the U.S., and neither's hands are clean in the housing bust, but that's not what the Justice Department and bank regulators are going after them for. The case against Credit Suisse reportedly hinges on its selling tax shelters to Americans, and BNP is accused of conducting business with U.S.-blacklisted countries like Sudan and Iran. Criminal investigations are underway for U.S. banks, but at a less-advanced stage, The Times reports.

If you were inclined toward cynicism, you might suggest that unlike foreign banks, Wall Street giants tend to donate liberally to U.S. politicians in both parties — and they're potential (high-paying) future employers for government bank regulators. But it's probably more likely in this case that prosecutors will have an easier time making the case that Credit Suisse and BNP Paribas actually broke the law.

What Wall Street banks did to the economy and hundred of thousands of unlucky homebuyers may be "criminal" in the figurative sense — as in, "casting Keanu Reeves in that role is criminal" — but proving that bankers committed actual legal crimes is tricky. There's the law, and this other problem: If banks are convicted of a crime, bank regulators may have to pull their charters, which "amounts to a death sentence for a bank," former U.S. prosecutor Daniel Levy tells The Times. A guilty plea by BNP would be the biggest from a bank since junk-bond pioneer Drexel Burnham Lambert in 1989. Peter Weber

8:57 p.m. ET
Nigel Waldron/Getty Images

While accepting the Nobel Peace Prize on Sunday, the director of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) warned that "the deaths of millions may be one tiny tantrum away."

During the ceremony in Oslo, Beatrice Fihn said the world has a choice to make — "the end of nuclear weapons or the end of us" — and the risk of using nuclear weapons is "greater now than during the Cold War." As North Korea continues to test missiles, including some believed to be able to deliver a nuclear warhead to the continental U.S., and the war of words between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un continues to escalate, a "moment of panic" could lead to "the destruction of cities and the deaths of millions of civilians," Fihn said. ICAN, a coalition of hundreds of non-governmental organizations, formed in 2007, and aims to ban all nuclear weapons. Catherine Garcia

1:13 p.m. ET

Republican Roy Moore and Democrat Doug Jones are running to fill the Alabama Senate seat vacated by Attorney General Jeff Sessions — but don't forget, Alabama is already represented in the Senate by Sen. Richard Shelby (R), who told CNN's Jake Tapper on Sunday he does not want Moore as a colleague.

"I'd rather see the Republican win, but I'd rather see a Republican write-in. I couldn't vote for Roy Moore," Shelby said on State of the Union. "I didn't vote for Roy Moore, but I wrote in a distinguished Republican name, and I think a lot of people could do that. Will they do it, I'm not sure."

"I understand [Republicans] would like to retain that seat in the U.S. Senate," he continued, " but I tell you what, there's a time — we call it a tipping point. I think, so many accusations, so many cuts, so many drip, drip, drip. When it got to the 14-year-old's story, that was enough for me. I said, 'I can't vote for Roy Moore.'"

Shelby affirmed he thinks the women who have accused Moore "are believable," arguing that the GOP and Alabama alike can do better. Watch an excerpt of Shelby's interview below. Bonnie Kristian

12:50 p.m. ET

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley maintained on CNN's State of the Union Sunday that President Trump's decision to formally recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel this past week will not hinder the Israel-Palestine peace process.

"When it comes to those that are upset, we knew that was going to happen. But courage does cause that. When you make a decision, you're going to have some that see it negatively and you're going to have some that see it positively," she told host Jake Tapper. "But I strongly believe this is going to move the ball forward for the peace process."

Trump's controversial announcement sparked outrage among religious leaders and Arab League nations, as well as protests by Muslims worldwide, some of them violent. Watch an excerpt of Haley's comments below, or watch the full interview via CNN here. Bonnie Kristian

12:09 p.m. ET

"Women who accuse anyone [of sexual misconduct] should be heard. They should be heard and they should be dealt with," U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley said Sunday on CBS' Face the Nation. "And I think we heard from them prior to the election. And I think any woman who has felt violated or felt mistreated in any way, they have every right to speak up," she continued.

Asked whether the election means sexual misconduct accusations against President Trump are a "settled issue, " Haley said the public must make that call. "I know that he was elected," she said. "But, you know, women should always feel comfortable coming forward. And we should all be willing to listen to them."

Watch a clip of Haley's CBS appearance below. Bonnie Kristian

10:42 a.m. ET

After coming under criticism for being too slow to address sexual misconduct allegations against media figures like producer Harvey Weinstein, Saturday Night Live has been making up for lost time. The latest episode sees the subject pop up in the cold open, a Weekend Update segment, and a sketch called "Sexual Harassment Charlie."

The scene is an office workplace, where two newly fired employees — James Franco's CFO Doug and Kenan Thompson's elderly front desk man, Charlie — are apologizing to their female coworkers for past sexual harassment. Doug apologizes for inappropriate nicknames and compliments, while Charlie is sorry for making comments like, "If I was 11 years younger, I'd put you in a large sack, throw you in the trunk of my Eldorado, drive you to my sister's house with a big old medical bed, crack open the windows, and show you a good old time for 28 minutes."

Where Doug's apologies are met with renewed disgust, the women wave away Charlie's vivid retelling of his far more serious misconduct as "Charlie being Charlie." The skit's interrogation of inconsistencies in how we respond to harassment ends with an unexpected twist. Watch the whole thing below. Bonnie Kristian

10:14 a.m. ET
Anwar Amro/Getty Images

Lebanese security forces deployed tear gas and water cannons against protesters outside the U.S. Embassy near Beirut, Lebanon, on Sunday. The demonstrators, who threw rocks and set fires in the road, were protesting President Trump's announcement that the United States will recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital. Some protesters reportedly attempted to break into the American diplomatic compound by climbing through barbed wire defenses, and Lebanese police barricaded the road near the embassy entrance.

"There is a lot of anger here. What they're chanting is, 'Palestine forgive us, they closed the door on us,' clearly in reference to Arab leaders," said Al Jazeera reporter Zeina Khodr, who was on the scene. "The protesters here feel Arab leaders have just been talking, but not taking any action." Bonnie Kristian

10:05 a.m. ET
Adam Ihse/Getty Images

A synagogue in the city of Gothenburg, Sweden, was attacked with firebombs late Saturday evening while a youth event was happening inside. No one was injured, and the building was not damaged. Swedish authorities have arrested three people in connection to the attack, and eyewitnesses report the flaming objects were thrown by a group of about a dozen young men.

The attack has been linked in news reports to Friday protests in Malmo, Sweden, in which critics of President Trump's decision to acknowledge Jerusalem as Israel's capital shouted anti-Semitic slogans. "I'm terribly upset over the attack on a synagogue in Goteborg yesterday and calls for violence against Jews at a demonstration in Malmo," Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Lofven said Sunday. "There is no place for anti-Semitism in our Swedish society. The perpetrators will be held accountable." Bonnie Kristian

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