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March 19, 2014
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NBA jerseys are soon going to closely resemble a NASCAR uniform. NBA Commissioner Adam Silver said today it's "inevitable" that the league's uniforms are going to be plastered with several corporate logos within the next five years.

Several of the league's major sponsors, like Coca-Cola, Samsung, and State Farm, have expressed interest in placing their logos on players' jerseys. Since this practice is common in the British Premier League, NASCAR, and international soccer leagues, Silver argued that fans are already used to it. "I think it's going to become more acceptable and more commonplace," he told Ad Age.

Of course, the initiative could offer the NBA another hefty revenue stream: A 2011 estimate said it could bring $100 million in new ad revenue to the league. But will there be fan mutiny? Only time will tell. Jordan Valinsky

11:26 p.m. ET
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The Washington Capitals defeated the Tampa Bay Lightning 4-0 in Game 7 of the Stanley Cup playoffs Wednesday, and will face the Vegas Golden Knights in the finals starting Monday in Las Vegas.

The Capitals haven't played in the Stanley Cup Finals since 1998, when they lost to the Detroit Red Wings, and this is only their second trip in the team's 44-year history. Meanwhile, the Vegas Golden Knights reached the finals in their first season as a team. Catherine Garcia

11:03 p.m. ET
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North Korea is again threatening to not attend a summit next month with President Trump, with the country's vice minister of foreign affairs blasting Vice President Mike Pence for his "ignorant" comments comparing North Korea to Libya.

North Korea's state news agency KCNA on Thursday quoted Choe Son Hui as saying North Korea will "neither beg the U.S. for dialogue nor take the trouble to persuade them if they do not want to sit together with us. Whether the U.S. will meet us at a meeting room or encounter us at nuclear-to-nuclear showdown is entirely dependent upon the decision and behavior of the United States."

Pence made his remarks during an interview with Fox News on Monday, saying it would be a "mistake" for North Korea to "play" Trump, and Washington could return to the "Libya model." In 2004, Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi made a deal with the U.S. to give up his nuclear weapons, and in 2011, after being forced out of power, he was captured and brutally killed. Catherine Garcia

10:29 p.m. ET
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Milwaukee Police Chief Alfonso Morales said on Wednesday that officers who used a stun gun on Milwaukee Bucks player Sterling Brown in January "acted inappropriately" and have been disciplined.

Morales released 30 minutes of body camera footage showing the incident, which began in the early hours of Jan. 26 in front of a Walgreens. The video shows an officer approach Brown, whose car appears to be parked so it takes up three spaces. After a few minutes, they begin arguing, and more police cars drive up. Brown is heard asking what is going on, and eight minutes in, he's told to take his hands out of his pockets. An officer is then heard yelling, "Taser! Taser! Taser!" Officers are later seen looking through Brown's car, and one is heard telling another, "He was being an ass and trying to hide something."

Brown was arrested, but criminal charges were never filed. The Bucks released a statement supporting Brown, calling the incident "shameful and inexcusable," and Brown, who plans on suing the department, said the experience "has forced me to stand up and tell my story so that I can help prevent these injustices from happening in the future." Morales apologized for the incident, saying he was sorry it "escalated to this level." Catherine Garcia

9:20 p.m. ET
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On Wednesday, ABC canceled The Chew to make room for a third hour of Good Morning America, which will air in the afternoon.

The new Good Morning America program will take over The Chew's time slot in September. Staffers were notified Wednesday and "completely blindsided," one person with knowledge of the situation told Us Weekly. "They were under the impression that the show was still strong and would continue." New episodes of The Chew, now in its seventh season, will start taping in June, to air through the summer.

Former co-host Mario Batali was fired from the show in December after allegations of sexual misconduct were made against him. Earlier this week, it was reported that the celebrity chef is under investigation by the NYPD for alleged sex-related crimes, but a representative for ABC told AOL the cancelation was "a business decision" and Batali "did not factor into this." Last week, co-host Carla Hall revealed that there were no plans to replace Batali on the show. Catherine Garcia

8:28 p.m. ET
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Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) didn't name President Trump directly in his remarks to Harvard Law School graduates on Wednesday, but with a dig about selling red hats, it was clear who the retiring senator was talking about.

Flake said the United States "may have hit rock bottom. This is it. If you have been wondering what the bottom looks like, this is what it looks like when you stress-test all of the institutions that undergird our constitutional democracy at the same time." The presidency has been "debased" by a "figure who seemingly has a bottomless appetite for destruction and division, and only a passing familiarity with how the Constitution works," Flake said. It's time for people to stop equating being "cruel" with making "America great," he said, adding, "to be clear, we did not become great – and will never be great — by indulging and encouraging our very worst impulses. It doesn't matter how many red caps you sell."

Flake has been one of the few Republicans in the Senate to go after Trump, and he told the graduates that there are "times when circumstances may call on you to risk your career in favor of your principles. But you, and your country, will be better for it. You can go elsewhere for a job, but you cannot go elsewhere for a soul." The country is divided, but "we need each other, and it is a scoundrel who would prosper politically by turning us against each other." Catherine Garcia

7:25 p.m. ET
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The way Rudy Giuliani has been running his mouth the last month, you'd think he was in constant communication with President Trump, but surprise! They haven't spoken in weeks.

Giuliani, one of Trump's newest lawyers, told BuzzFeed News that the last time they talked was "a couple of weeks ago," and "people from our office" are the ones communicating with Trump. When asked how often, he said, "Talking, correspondence? A couple of times a week." Giuliani has appeared on countless TV news programs over the last month, and given dozens of interviews with media outlets, where he intimated that he knew exactly what Trump was thinking and chatted with him often.

The Washington Post also interviewed Giuliani on Wednesday morning, with the article running under the headline, "In reversal, Giuliani now says Trump should do interview with Mueller team." Giuliani told BuzzFeed News, "no, I didn't say that," then admitted he did say that, but "that doesn't mean we've reversed though. That's always been true." On Tuesday, however, Giuliani told The Wall Street Journal that if investigators told Trump he "had to" sit for an interview, "the answer would have to be no." Catherine Garcia

6:51 p.m. ET
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In an interview with The New York Times, Arrested Development's Jessica Walter said that she has to "let go of being angry" at her co-star, Jeffrey Tambor, publicly commenting for the first time on an on-set incident where Tambor blew up at her.

Tambor mentioned the incident during an earlier interview with The Hollywood Reporter, after he was fired from Transparent over allegations of sexual misconduct (he denies the accusations). In tears, Walter said that "in almost 60 years of working, I've never had anybody yell at me like that on a set and it's hard to deal with, but I'm over it now. I just let it go right here, for The New York Times."

Co-stars Jason Bateman, David Cross, and Tony Hale jumped to defend Tambor, with Bateman telling the Times that a lot of performers are "difficult" and Cross saying it's "important" for people to know Tambor "learned from the experience and he's listening and learning and growing." Hale said that everyone has "had moments," but Walter spoke up, saying, "but not like that, not like that. That was bad." Co-star Alia Shawkat supported Walter, saying that just because someone acts out on set it "doesn't mean it's acceptable. And the point is that things are changing, and people need to respect each other differently." Arrested Development's fifth season debuts on Netflix May 29. Read the entire interview at The New York Times. Catherine Garcia

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