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February 14, 2016
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In his first full day in Mexico, Pope Francis spoke directly to the issues facing the nation Saturday, the Los Angeles Times reports.

"I beg that you not underestimate the moral and antisocial challenge which the drug trade represents for Mexican society as a whole, as well as for the church," he told church leaders at a Mexico City cathedral.

The pope also delivered a speech to politicians alongside President Enrique Peña Nieto. Francis stressed the need to care about the common good, not just those who are privileged.

"Each time we seek the path of privileges or benefits for a few, to the detriment of the good of all, the life of society becomes a fertile soil for corruption, drug trade, exclusion of different cultures, violence, and also human trafficking, kidnapping, and death, bringing suffering and slowing down development," Francis said. Julie Kliegman

6:41 p.m. ET
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The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is instructing owners of 313,000 older Hondas and Acuras to stop what they're doing and replace the Takata airbag inflators inside their cars.

"These vehicles are unsafe and need to be repaired immediately," Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx said in a statement on Thursday. "Folks should not drive these vehicles unless they are going straight to a dealer to have them repaired." The advisory is for 2001 and 2002 Honda Civics and Accords, 2002 and 2003 Acura TL, 2002 Honda Odyssey and CR-V, and 2003 Acura CL and Honda Pilot. The older the vehicle, the more time the inflator has spent in heat and humidity, and that makes them more likely to malfunction, The Associated Press reports.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has conducted tests on inflators taken from older Hondas owned by people living near the Gulf Coast, and about half of them blew apart. If an inflator explodes, it spews metal fragments into the vehicle, potentially killing or injuring the driver and any passengers. To see if your car is part of the recall, visit safercar.gov and enter your vehicle identification number. Catherine Garcia

5:02 p.m. ET
REUTERS/Carlos Barria

On Thursday, Judge Martin Welch vacated the murder conviction of Adnan Syed, the Baltimore man at the center of the first season of the wildly popular true-crime podcast Serial, and granted him a new trial. Syed's attorneys tweeted Thursday that Syed had won a new trial after a Baltimore judge ruled that his original attorney failed to properly cross-examine incriminating cell-tower evidence.

Syed's current defense team successfully re-opened post conviction hearings this past February and in March filed a post-hearing motion to add new evidence to the record, partially due to the popularity of and unearthed information from Serial. Syed is currently serving a life sentence plus 30 years after being convicted in 2000 of murdering his ex-girlfriend Hae Min Lee while they were both seniors at Woodlawn High School in Baltimore. Kimberly Alters

4:13 p.m. ET

Speaking 2,656 miles from the Mexican border in Manchester, New Hampshire, on Thursday, Donald Trump interrupted his latest policy speech to point out a random passing airplane, warning that it could be "a Mexican plane up there, they're getting ready to attack."

It should be noted that we are not at war with Mexico. Jeva Lange

3:05 p.m. ET
Newsmakers

The oceans are rising, Oregon will basically fall into the sea when the Big One hits, and the globe just keeps getting hotter. But hey, look on the bright side — at least the giant hole in the ozone is on track to be fully healed later this century!

The spot of good news comes from Susan Solomon, the lead author in a study published Thursday in Science that appears to prove that the hole in the ozone above the Antarctic is on track to actually repair itself sometime around 2060. The researchers praise the 1987 Montreal Protocol as at least partially responsible for the progress, thanks to its ban of chlorinated compounds in refrigerator coolants and aerosols, which used to float up to terrorize the stratosphere.

"I think a lot of people feel that environmental stories always have bad endings. In this case, the recovery will happen, but it'll take time," atmospheric chemist Susan Strahan said after evaluating the researchers' evidence.

Solomon agreed. "This is a reminder that when the world gets together, we really can solve environmental problems. I think we should all congratulate ourselves on a job well done," she told Gizmodo.

There you have it — give yourself a pat on the back. Good work, team. Jeva Lange

1:58 p.m. ET

Secretary of Defense Ash Carter has announced that transgender members of the military will be allowed to serve openly, putting an end to the Pentagon's ban. Carter added that the changes will begin to be implemented over the course of the next year.

Although there are already thousands of transgender people in the military, they risked being discharged if discovered, just as gay and lesbian troops did before "don't ask, don't tell" was repealed in 2011. Still, some in the upper ranks of the military have worried that the "social experiment" could hurt the military's ability to operate effectively, although Carter has condemned the transgender ban as being outdated. Studies have also failed to prove that the inclusion of transgender members would stunt the military's preparedness. Jeva Lange

1:29 p.m. ET
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The United Nations Human Rights Council voted Thursday to create a role for a global LGBT rights monitor, the first position of its kind in the U.N. The person will be an "independent expert" who works as a watchdog for "violence and discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity." The resolution passed in a vote of 23 to 18, with six nations abstaining, and it marks a major step toward the international community recognizing LGBT rights as legal, universal rights.

Pakistan led the opposition to the resolution on the behalf of the majority of the Organization for Islamic Cooperation, with Albania being the only OIC member to support the resolution. The IOC managed to pass amendments highlighting the respect for local values, "religious sensitivities," and domestic policies, BuzzFeed reports. The bloc also managed to add an amendment disapproving of countries that take up "coercive measures" in order to influence local policies, such as when the U.S. changed its aid to Uganda following an anti-LGBT law that was passed there in 2014. Jeva Lange

1:13 p.m. ET
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New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is being vetted as Donald Trump's possible running mate, say sources who have been briefed on the process and who spoke anonymously with The New York Times. Trump's foe in the primaries, Christie has since settled in as the presumptive GOP nominee's right-hand man — the extent of which draws henchman-like comparisons as Christie has been rumored to fetch Trump McDonald's orders and was mocked for looking like a hostage as he shadowed Trump during a speech.

"I think he's been diminished by the way the Trump organization has used him, and I think that's really unfortunate," Christie's New Hampshire strategist, Joel Maiola, observed.

Still, those familiar with Christie's role in the Trump campaign aren't surprised that Trump has vowed Christie will find a prominent place in his White House. Christie has reportedly advised Trump on his speeches, policies, and was one of the insiders who suggested Trump drop Corey Lewandowski as campaign manager.

Trump has joked that Christie is even responsible for bulldozing fellow 2016 competitor Marco Rubio out of the way for him during the primaries. According to recent attendees of a fundraiser, Trump went as far as to thank Christie for "being the bad guy." Jeva Lange

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