Feature

Monks sell St. Bernards

The week's news at a glance.

St. Bernard Pass, Switzerland

The monks who run the hostel at the St. Bernard Pass in the Alps said this week they must sell the famous rescue dogs they’ve bred for centuries. St. Bernards, with their keen sense of smell and tremendous endurance, have plowed through snowbanks to rescue some 2,000 travelers over the past 200 years. But the last such rescue mission was in 1975, and since then helicopters have picked up stranded hikers. The dogs are now just a tourist attraction, and the monks say they can’t afford to feed the 34 dogs currently in their care all winter. “It will take a load off of us and allow us to spend more time with those who need it,” said Brother Frederic. The new owners will be required to return the dogs to the pass every summer for the tourist season.

Recommended

South Korean military says North Korea fired 'unidentified projectile' into sea
File footage of a North Korean missile launch airs on South Korean TV.
all eyes on north korea

South Korean military says North Korea fired 'unidentified projectile' into sea

Germany's next governing coalition could be determined by 3rd- and 4th-place parties
Annalena Baerbock.
what's next for germany

Germany's next governing coalition could be determined by 3rd- and 4th-place parties

Other countries are besting even the most vaccinated U.S. state
Burlington, VT.
vaccinate the world

Other countries are besting even the most vaccinated U.S. state

How the U.S. bungled farm building in Afghanistan
Afghan farmer.
After Afghanistan

How the U.S. bungled farm building in Afghanistan

Most Popular

7 cartoons about America's vaccine fights
Editorial Cartoon.
Feature

7 cartoons about America's vaccine fights

Jimmy Fallon and Nicole Kidman almost make it through interview without awkwardness
Jimmy Fallon and Nicole Kidman
Last Night on Late Night

Jimmy Fallon and Nicole Kidman almost make it through interview without awkwardness

Tigray and the shredding of international law
A Tigray child.
Picture of Ryan CooperRyan Cooper

Tigray and the shredding of international law