'Support for abortion rights does not override partisanship'

Opinion, comment and editorials of the day

 Abortion-rights activists march to the U.S. Supreme Court on June 24, 2023
Abortion-rights activists march to the U.S. Supreme Court on June 24, 2023
(Image credit: Anna Rose Layden / Getty Images)

'Many pro-choice voters are still quite willing to vote for Republican candidates'

Ruy Teixeira in The Washington Post

The "conventional wisdom" is that the overturning of Roe v. Wade helps Democrats "hammer the Republicans as the sworn enemies of abortion and women's reproductive freedom," says Ruy Teixeira in The Washington Post. But "when two candidates are on the ballot," partisanship overrides support for abortion rights, even for "many pro-choice voters." In 2024, abortion will help Democrats, but it won't be the issue Republicans "can't wriggle their way out of," as Democrats hope.

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'Bizarre badmouthing of Operation Warp Speed'

Will Saletan in The Bulwark

"Nikki Haley is running as the sane Republican alternative to Donald Trump," says Will Saletan in The Bulwark. So, it's "cringey to see her criticize Trump for the best thing his administration did." Haley, in an outburst of "free-market orthodoxy," criticized Operation Warp Speed, the project to quickly develop coronavirus vaccines, as if it were "just another subsidy." Solving a crisis like the pandemic required "help from the government. Even Donald Trump understood that."

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'Never have college campuses exerted so great or so destructive an influence'

John Ellis in The Wall Street Journal

College campuses are among America's most "destructive influences," says John Ellis in The Wall Street Journal. Many "calamities" plaguing the United States, from "an outbreak of virulent antisemitism" to poorly educated children, "can be traced wholly or in large part" to "the corruption of higher education by radical political activists." State lawmakers help fix things by using their control over education funding to get schools to "install new campus leadership" willing to end the tyranny. 

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'If Israel's actions lead to a wider war, the U.S. will find itself with few allies'

Medea Benjamin and Nicolas J.S. Davies in Salon

If U.S. officials want to keep the Israel-Hamas conflict from "exploding into a regional war, they "should work to stop Israel's massacre in Gaza," say Medea Benjamin and Nicolas J.S. Davies in Salon. Warning others to stay out while Israel acts "with impunity" increases the odds other Arab nations will jump in. It would be wiser to "cool hostilities" and "get out of the way” while others "negotiate a real solution to the occupation of Palestine."

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