Scientists reveal that King Tut had 'feminine hips' and an overbite, thanks to inbreeding

Scientists reveal that King Tut had 'feminine hips' and an overbite, thanks to inbreeding

Scientists have created a digital rendering of King Tutankhamun — and he's not nearly as attractive as his mummy's mask would lead you to believe.

The golden mask shows a handsome young man with killer blue eyeliner. But a "virtual autopsy" has revealed that King Tut actually had a number of physical deformities, because his parents may have been siblings.

Researchers at Italy's Institute for Mummies and the Iceman (yes, that is a real thing) used 2,000 computer scans of King Tut's mummified remains to determine that he had "an overbite, feminine hips, and a club foot," according to The Sunday Times.

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King Tut, who ruled Egypt in the 14th century B.C.E., died at 19. The scientist believe he may have died from an "inherited ailment," according to Raw Story. King Tut also suffered from Kohler's disease, a genetic disorder that causes blood loss in the foot.

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