The GOP tax law could spark a mad rush to divorce court

The GOP tax law is messing with divorce talks
(Image credit: iStock)

Starting in 2019, for the first time in 77 years, alimony won't be deductible for U.S. taxpayers, thanks to the Republican tax overhaul passed in December. That means that the new tax law "could soon lead to a surge in married couples calling it quits," Politico reports, citing divorce lawyers. "Now's not the time to wait," said Mary Vidas, former chairwoman of the American Bar Association's family law section. "If you're going to get a divorce, get it now."

For wealthy divorcés, especially, the deduction meant they could pay roughly 60 cents for every dollar of alimony. Divorce lawyers say the change in the tax law could lead to more contentious divorce cases and lower alimony payments when it kicks in, disproportionally hurting women. But ending the deduction is also projected to raise $6.9 billion over 10 years, helping defray the $1 trillion-plus cost of the tax bill. "This is one of the many provisions of the law that removes special rules applicable only in certain circumstances in order to help simplify the code and reduce tax rates for all Americans," said a spokesman for House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady (R-Texas), who put together much of the tax legislation.

Subscribe to The Week

Escape your echo chamber. Get the facts behind the news, plus analysis from multiple perspectives.

SUBSCRIBE & SAVE
https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/flexiimages/jacafc5zvs1692883516.jpg

Sign up for The Week's Free Newsletters

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

Sign up
To continue reading this article...
Continue reading this article and get limited website access each month.
Get unlimited website access, exclusive newsletters plus much more.
Cancel or pause at any time.
Already a subscriber to The Week?
Not sure which email you used for your subscription? Contact us