Huge British coronavirus drug trial could produce results by June

British coronavirus hospital
(Image credit: Jacob King/Pool/AFP/Getty Images)

Britain has enrolled more than 5,000 COVID-19 patients, or 10 percent of the country's cases, in a clinical trial to test out several drugs to treat the new coronavirus. The Recovery trial, conducted at 165 National Health Service hospitals, is "by far the largest trial in the world," Peter Horby, the Oxford University infectious disease professor leading it, told The Guardian. With such a large number of subjects, "we're guessing some time in June we may get the results," though "if it is really clear that there are benefits, an answer will be available quicker," he added.

The study has randomly split the subjects into groups of 500 to 900 to test different drugs, with 2,000 patients getting placebos in a control group. Among the drugs being tested — first individually, but later perhaps in different combinations — are the anti-malaria drug hydroxychloroquine, the antibiotic azithromycin, two HIV antiretroviral drugs (lopinavir-ritonavir), and the anti-inflammatory steroid dexamethasone. Horby said his team will include other drugs soon and hopes to obtain a supply of the experimental antiviral drug remdesivir.

Subscribe to The Week

Escape your echo chamber. Get the facts behind the news, plus analysis from multiple perspectives.

SUBSCRIBE & SAVE
https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/flexiimages/jacafc5zvs1692883516.jpg

Sign up for The Week's Free Newsletters

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

Sign up
To continue reading this article...
Continue reading this article and get limited website access each month.
Get unlimited website access, exclusive newsletters plus much more.
Cancel or pause at any time.
Already a subscriber to The Week?
Not sure which email you used for your subscription? Contact us