Coronavirus is spiking disproportionately in counties that voted for Trump in 2016

Coronavirus testing in the Navajo nation.
(Image credit: MARK RALSTON/AFP via Getty Images)

The 2016 election may help map the next coronavirus hotspots.

While COVID-19 is finally beginning to wane in some of the U.S. cities it hit hardest and earliest, coronavirus spread is still far from its peak in most small cities and rural areas across the country. And over the past four weeks, it's been more likely that counties will show a high prevalence of coronavirus next if they voted for President Trump in 2016, an analysis by the Brookings Institution reveals.

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