an aspirin a day
August 6, 2014
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A large review of scientific studies revealed that a small daily dose of aspirin can significantly reduce the risks of certain cancers, Reuters reports. Daily intake of 75 to 100 milligrams of aspirin significantly reduced the rates of developing or even dying from bowel, stomach, and esophageal cancer, according to analysis of all available evidence from studies and clinical trials.

Of course, there are caveats: Researchers found that individuals would need to take the daily dose for at least five years to reap the benefits — perhaps up to 10 years — and the study specified effectiveness for people between the ages of 50 and 65. Additionally, the risks of bleeding in the stomach due to prolonged aspirin intake are still a factor, researchers said.

Still, the findings indicated that bowel cancer cases could be cut by about 35 percent and deaths by about 40 percent, while rates of esophageal and stomach cancer could be cut by about 30 percent with deaths from these cancers being reduced by 35 to 50 percent. In general, for 50- to 65-year-old individuals, taking aspirin daily for 10 years could result in a "9 percent reduction in the number of cancers, strokes, and heart attacks overall in men, and around 7 percent in women," said Professor John Cuzick, head of the Center for Cancer Prevention at London's Queen Mary University, in a statement.

"Whilst there are some serious side effects that can't be ignored, taking aspirin daily looks to be the most important thing we can do to reduce cancer after stopping smoking and reducing obesity, and will probably be much easier to implement," Cuzick said. Kimberly Alters

2016 Watch
2:49 p.m. ET
Screenshot / CBS

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) on Sunday said that while he believes sexual orientation is an inborn trait, he still opposes same-sex marriage.

"I don't believe same-sex marriage is a Constitutional right. I also don't believe that your sexual preferences are a choice for the vast and enormous majority of people," Rubio said on Face the Nation, adding that "sexual preference is something that people are born with."

Rubio said states have traditionally regulated marriage, and that he believes they should continue to do so without interference from the courts. —Jon Terbush

Quotables
2:04 p.m. ET
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Jon Stewart says his decision to leave The Daily Show after a 16-year run was not based on concerns with the show's direction, but rather the result of him no longer "getting the same satisfaction" from his work.

"These things are cyclical," he told the Guardian. "You have moments of dissatisfaction, and then you come out of it and it's OK. But the cycles become longer and maybe more entrenched, and that's when you realize, 'OK, I'm on the back side of it now.'"

In the interview, Stewart also discussed the state of the media and his regrets over a "shi--y" interview with Donald Rumsfeld, among other things. Check out the whole profile here. Jon Terbush

Watch this
1:30 p.m. ET
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Patti Smith on Saturday delivered a teary-eyed speech at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's induction ceremony for the late Lou Reed, saying the famed musician's "consciousness infiltrated and illuminated our cultural voice."

Smith spoke about a decades-long friendship with Reed that began as both artists developed in the New York City music scene of the 1970s. And describing the day Reed died, Smith said she realized the Velvet Underground frontman was "not only my friend, he was the friend of New York City."

"True poets must often stand alone," she said. "As a poet, he must be counted as a solitary artist. So, Lou, thank you for brutally and benevolently injecting your poetry into music." —Jon Terbush

Iran and the bomb
12:10 p.m. ET
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Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei on Sunday accused the U.S. of fabricating tales of Iranian nuclear weapons.

"They created the myth of nuclear weapons so they could say the Islamic Republic is a source of threat," Khamenei said in an address to military commanders. "No, the source of threat is America itself, with its unrestrained, destabilizing interventions."

The remark came one day before nuclear negotiations between Iran, the U.S., and five world powers were to resume. The negotiators have until June 30 to reach a final accord. Jon Terbush

2016 Watch
11:39 a.m. ET
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Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) says he will almost certainly get into the 2016 White House race.

"If I can raise the money, I'll do it," Graham said on Fox News Sunday. When pressed to say how seriously he was considering a presidential bid, Graham pegged his odds of running at the oddly specific "91 percent."

In January, Graham launched a presidential exploratory committee. Sens. Ted Cruz (Texas), Rand Paul (Ky.), and Marco Rubio (Fla.) are the only major GOP candidates to formally declare their candidacies for the White House. Jon Terbush

Foot meet mouth
11:13 a.m. ET
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Poland on Sunday summoned the U.S. ambassador to protest FBI Director James Comey's recent comment casting some blame on Poland for the Holocaust.

"The murderers and accomplices of Germany, and Poland, and Hungary, and so many, many other places didn't do something evil," Comey said in a speech last week, which was then adapted as an opinion piece in The Washington Post. "They convinced themselves it was the right thing to do, the thing they had to do."

Poland's ambassador to the U.S. denounced the comment as "unacceptable" and a "falsification of history." Soon after, the U.S. Ambassador in Warsaw, Stephen Mull, told reporters that suggestions anyone "apart from the Nazi Germany was responsible for the Holocaust are wrong, harmful and offensive." Jon Terbush

2016 Watch
10:56 a.m. ET
Darren McCollester / Getty Images

A slew of declared and potential Republican presidential candidates trekked to New Hampshire this weekend for the two-day Republican Leadership Summit. Close to 20 prospective candidates — ranging from establishment types like New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and Jeb Bush, to bottom-tier hopefuls like Donald Trump and John Bolton — used their stage time to discuss policy, ding the president, and assail presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton.

"When Hillary Clinton travels, there's going to need to be two planes," Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) said. "One for her and her entourage, and one for her baggage."

Also at the event, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker said Clinton represented "the third term of Barack Obama," former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee denounced the "Clinton political machine," and Sen. Ted Cruz (Texas) quipped that Clinton was not at the event because it was not being bankrolled by foreign interests. Jon Terbush

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