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August 5, 2014

Researchers at MIT, Adobe, and Microsoft joined forces to develop an algorithm that is able to recreate an audio signal by studying the tiny vibrations of objects.

The team recorded videos of aluminum foil, the surface of a glass of water, the leaves of a plant, and a potato chip bag, and then extracted audio signals. In the case of the potato chip bag, researchers filmed people talking 15 feet away behind soundproof glass, yet were still able to recover "intelligible speech from the vibrations of the bag," MIT reports.

One of the study's authors, graduate student Abe Davis, says that when sound hits objects it makes them vibrate, but those vibrations are so tiny that the naked eye can rarely see them. "People didn't realize that this information was there," he said.

Watch the video below to gain further insight into these "visual microphones" and to see and hear the actual experiments. --Catherine Garcia

4:59 a.m. ET
William Edwards/AFP/Getty Images

Back in January, when he was having a fight with Fox News, Donald Trump skipped out on a Fox News–sponsored presidential debate and held his own rally and fundraiser for charities dedicated to military veterans. "We just cracked $6 million! Right? $6 million," he said at the Iowa event. And "Donald Trump gave $1 million." That wasn't true until Monday night, David A. Fahrenthold says at The Washington Post, after Fahrenthold had taken to Twitter to try ascertain how many veterans' charities had received any money from Trump.

On Monday night, Trump called the home of James Kallstrom, chairman of the Marine Corps-Law Enforcement Foundation, and pledged $1 million, according to Kallstrom's wife. When Fahernthold asked Trump over the phone on Tuesday why it took him four months to follow through on his pledge, Trump said, "You have a lot of vetting to do." Fahernthold suggested that perhaps Trump had only taken action because reporters were asking him about his pledge, Trump shot back: "You know, you're a nasty guy. You're really a nasty guy. I gave out millions of dollars that I had no obligation to do." Trump also said that the fundraiser had rounded up about $5.5 million total, and that, despite the assertion of campaign manager Corey Lewandowski, no major pledgees had dropped out, though "some of them came through very late."

Trump said he would have his staff send The Washington Post a list of groups that received the donations, but hadn't as of Tuesday night. Veterans' groups have been trying to figure out how to apply for some of the remaining millions, since there is no application process. But at least one group has been contacted since Monday, the Boston Wounded Vet Bike Run, founded by Andrew Biggio. Biggio told The Post that a Trump campaign worker had called him out of the blue on Tuesday to ask for the nonprofit's phone number, and that he hadn't applied for any of the money. However, he did suggest how he got on Trump's radar: "I served in Iraq with Donald Trump's bodyguard's son." You can read more at The Washington Post. Peter Weber

3:36 a.m. ET

Congress has an approval rating of 14 percent, and Seth Meyers has some theories about that. On Tuesday's Late Night, he took a break from the media-consuming presidential campaign to focus on what Congress is not doing. "Obstruction in Congress has been on full display in recent months, with Senate Republicans refusing to even hold hearings on President Obama's nominee to the Supreme Court, Merrick Garland," and House Republicans short-changing anti-Zika funding and playing fast and loose with House rules to thwart a LGBT anti-discrimination bill.

Meyers mocked the Democrats' "lame" recent move to hold mock hearings on Garland, but he spent most of his time focused on the GOP. "So Republicans have basically paralyzed the government, they can't even perform basic constitutional functions or respond to public health emergencies, and maybe the worst is, Republican obstruction has become completely normalized," he said. "No one even questions it anymore." But of course, the presidential race is still the big news, and Meyers found a way to work Donald Trump in at the end. Watch below. Peter Weber

2:56 a.m. ET
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After weeks of speculation, House Speaker Paul Ryan will endorse his party's presumptive presidential nominee, Donald Trump, unidentified senior Trump campaign sources tell ABC News. Ryan is the highest-ranking Republican official, and his endorsement would widely be seen as a sign that the Republican Party is uniting after its divisive primary. The Trump sources did not say when this endorsement would happen, but ABC's Brian McBride noted that Ryan has a press briefing on Wednesday. If Ryan does not endorse Trump then, he will certainly get questions about it. Peter Weber

2:36 a.m. ET
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On Wednesday, the Afghan Taliban confirmed the death of its leader, Mullah Akthar Mansour, killed in a U.S. drone strike, and named his replacement, Mawlawi Haibatullah Akhundzada. The statement was the Taliban's first confirmation of Mansour's death. Akhundzada, a Mansour deputy believed to be 45 to 50 years old, is the former chief of the Taliban courts and is considered more of a religious scholar than military commander; he is responsible for most of the fatwas, or religious edicts, from the Taliban. "Haibatullah Akhundzada has been appointed as the new leader of the Islamic Emirate (Taliban) after a unanimous agreement in the shura," or supreme council, the Taliban said, "and all the members of shura pledged allegiance to him."

Akhundzada was not considered a front-runner to replace Mansour, The New York Times reports, especially since another Mansour deputy, Sarajuddin Haqqani, had been running the day-to-day military operations for the Taliban. But the Taliban leaders meeting in Quetta, Pakistan, apparently wanted a lower-profile consensus candidate, recalling that former Taliban leader Mullah Muhammad Omar's reclusiveness kept him alive for many years. Peter Weber

1:51 a.m. ET

In Albuquerque on Tuesday, Donald Trump held his first campaign rally in almost two weeks, and he used his speech to criticize Hillary Clinton, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), and Gov. Susana Martinez (R-N.M.), the first Latina governor and current head of the Republican Governors Association. "You've got to get your governor to do a better job," he told the crowd of about 8,000. "She's not doing her job." He added, "Hey, maybe I'll run for governor of New Mexico." Martinez has declined to endorse Trump, and she and other state GOP leaders did not attend the rally.

Trump's rally was interrupted several times by protesters, but the real drama was happening outside the convention center.

Protesters outside the venue threw plastic bottles, burning Donald Trump T-shirts, and rocks at the police, and rushed a police barricade, trying to force their way into the Trump rally. The police fired pepper spray and threw smoke grenades into the scrum. Several Albuquerque police officers were injured by flying rocks, the police department said, and at least on person was "arrested from the riot." A glass door was broken, and the police said it appeared to have been hit by a pellet gun.

This was Trump's first visit to New Mexico. It was not the first violent protest outside a Trump rally. Peter Weber

12:44 a.m. ET

Gwen Sefani is a noted fan of Japanese culture. Her boyfriend, Blake Shelton, had never tried Japan's most famous food. Jimmy Fallon stepped in on Tuesday's Tonight Show, taking Shelton out for his first sushi dinner. At Nobu, the famous New York sushi restaurant.

They started with sake — it tasted like "Easter egg coloring," Shelton said — then the salmon. "That, right there, looks like a human tongue," Shelton said. And then he ate it: "The texture is play dough, but I will say this to you right now, man to man, I like that. I like how that tasted." That was the high-water mark. If you have never tried sushi before and are nervous, you can take comfort in Shelton's bravery — and if all else fails, you can repeat his refrain: "Hey, can we get some more rice wine?" Peter Weber

May 24, 2016
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Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton won their respective primaries in Washington State on Tuesday, but only Trump gets delegates for his victory. (Democrats allocated their delegates in March caucuses, which Bernie Sanders won.) Trump won at least 27 of the 44 delegates at stake, putting him just 41 delegates shy of clinching the Republican nomination, a formality since he is the only candidate left in the race. Trump and Clinton are expected to wrap up their nominations on June 7, the next and final contest in the 2016 primary season.

With about 70 percent of precincts reporting, Trump has 76 percent of the vote, versus about 10 percent each for Ted Cruz and John Kasich. Clinton is leading Sanders, 54 percent to 46 percent. Peter Weber

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