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February 1, 2016
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The two leading Democratic presidential candidates are crushing the fractured GOP field in the money race, according to fourth-quarter filings with the Federal Election Commission released Sunday. Leading all candidates in the last quarter was Hillary Clinton, who brought in $37.4 million, plus another $56.3 million raised in 2015 by her super PAC, Priorities USA Action (including $6 million from George Soros). The Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) campaign wasn't far behind, raising $33.6 million in the last quarter, plus, the campaign said Sunday, another $20 million in January, mostly from small donations. The nurses union super PAC backing Sanders raised $2.2 million in the second half of 2015.

On the Republican side, retired pediatric neurosurgeon Dr. Ben Carson had the best quarter, hauling in $22.6 million — but 85 percent of that was raised before Nov. 13, when his poll numbers started to slide as the Paris terrorist attack shifted the GOP's focus to terrorism and foreign policy. Sen. Ted Cruz came in second in the GOP fourth-quarter money race, raising $20.5 million. The frontrunner in the GOP polls, Donald Trump, raised $13.6 million in the last quarter, though about $10 million of that was a loan from Trump to his campaign. Here's a look at how much the major candidates raised in the final three months of 2015 and, in parentheses, the amount of cash they had on hand as of Dec. 31.

Hillary Clinton: $37.4 million ($38 million)
Bernie Sanders: $33.6 million ($28 million)
Ben Carson: $22.6 million ($6.6 million)
Ted Cruz: $20.5 million ($18.7 million)
Marco Rubio: $14.2 million ($10.4 million)
Donald Trump: $13.6 million ($7 million)
Jeb Bush: $7.1 milion ($7.6 million)
John Kasich: $3.2 million ($2.5 million)
Chris Christie: $3 million ($1.1 million)
Carly Fiorina: $2.9 million ($4.5 million)
Rand Paul: $2.1 million ($1.3 million)
Martin O'Malley: $1.5 million ($0.2 million)

None of the other candidates raised more than $1 million last quarter. Mike Huckabee scared up $700,000, and Rick Santorum raised less than $250,000, including a $24,000 loan he gave his campaign on Dec. 29. Santorum reported $43,000 cash on hand, but debts totaling $167,000. Peter Weber

7:25 a.m. ET
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With Hillary Clinton confirmed as the Democratic nominee, Day 3 of the Democratic convention will feature a speech by keynote speaker President Barack Obama, who defeated Clinton in the primaries eight years ago. Obama will reportedly defend his own time in office and promote Clinton as the best chance of extending his legacy.

Vice President Joe Biden, who some thought might step up to challenge Clinton for the nomination this year, will also speak, as will former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who one point considered a run as an Independent.

America will also meet Clinton's running mate Tim Kaine on Wednesday amid cries of dissatisfaction by Bernie Sanders supporters, who have called him an "unacceptable" pick. Jeva Lange

5:02 a.m. ET

Bill Clinton's speech at Tuesday's Democratic National Convention lasted 41 minutes, but CNN managed to fit it — and some highlights of speeches from Lena Dunham, Madeleine Albright, and mothers of the Black Lives Matter movement, plus the Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton cameos — into 97 seconds. If you missed Tuesday's history-making, star-packed convention, you can get a pretty decent sense below of what happened in less time than it took Bill Clinton to discuss his and Hillary's courtship. Peter Weber

4:42 a.m. ET

The 2016 Bernie Sanders presidential campaign officially died on Tuesday, when Democrats nominated Hillary Clinton as their presidential nominee. CNN embedded cameras with Sanders' faction of the California delegation — the largest and "loudest Bernie contingent" at the convention, CNN notes in the video below. The cameras roll as the last-ditch hopes turn to cheers as Sanders spoke, then to tears as he requested that Clinton be nominated by acclamation. "Really?" one Sanders delegate asks, incredulously. "Really? Really?" CNN's vignette leaves a slight aftertaste of exploitation, but it's also a real snapshot of a real moment at the Democratic convention. You can watch below. Peter Weber

4:14 a.m. ET

On Tuesday, Hillary Clinton became the first woman nominated for president by a major American political party — "and I'm being told, yes, the Democrats are still considered a major political party," Stephen Colbert said in his live, post-convention Late Show recap. "They had a rough week." Clinton appeared live via satellite at the convention "by breaking the glass, um, wall?" Colbert said. "Oh, so close to the proper metaphor. Jimmy, let's help her out here, let's break the glass ceiling." And they did. "This means Hillary Clinton could be the first female president, and America will finally catch up with 1960s Sri Lanka," he added.

Colbert finished up his recap with a pep talk for Bernie Sanders supporters, then made fun of macaroni and cheese, chided Howard Dean for not actually screaming, and took a slightly ribald look at "potential first ladies' man" Bill Clinton's big speech in support of his wife.

Sen. Cory Booker, speaking to Colbert live from the convention floor, liked Clinton's speech, and was enthusiastic about breaking a glass ceiling. "I think it's particularly significant, it's a real breakthrough that two men can talk about how significant this is for women right now," Colbert said. "I think we've come a long way." In the video below, you can watch Booker discuss getting booed on Monday night and hear his argument that the Sanders revolution makes the Democrats better. Peter Weber

3:21 a.m. ET

Some Bernie Sanders supporters put tape over their mouths at the Democratic National Convention, signaling their assertion that their voices weren't heard by the Democratic Party, or that the organizers of the convention were silencing them. Sanders super-fan Sarah Silverman was actually silenced, sort of, when the convention organizers quashed one of her proposed jokes at Monday night's convention, she told The New York Times:

At the very beginning, when Al said, "I'm Al Franken and this past year I've been hashtag-I'm With Her," and I was going to say, "And I'm Sarah Silverman, and this past year I've been with the possibly agnostic Jew." Because you know the Right is going to use these emails to try to separate them. It's what they want so badly. I just felt like, let the comedian defuse it and just address the elephant in the room. But they were like, no. And they are right. They're right. But I get so indignant. At least I'm aware, and awareness brings change so maybe I'll be less obnoxious. [Sarah Silverman, to The New York Times]

Instead of referencing the hacked and leaked Democratic National Committee emails, Silverman said that "this past year, I've been feeling the Bern," adding: "Relax, I put some cream on it." She told The Times on Tuesday that Jane Sanders had personally invited her to speak at the convention, that she had voted for Ralph Nader in 2000 but she'd "be crazy not to" vote for Clinton this year, and that "the fundamentalists of any group, including fans of Bernie or fans of Hillary or fans of anyone, are a bummer." You can read her full interview at The New York Times, and watch her convention speech below. Peter Weber

2:46 a.m. ET

Through design or happenstance, Donald Trump was the biggest celebrity at last week's Republican National Convention (sorry, Scott Baio). By the end of Tuesday's Democratic National Convention, Hillary Clinton's party had already showcased prime-time performances by Paul Simon, Alicia Keys, Demi Lovato, Andra Day, and Elizabeth Bank's all-star ad hoc a cappella group, and speeches from Meryl Streep, Lovato, Lena Dunham and America Ferrera, Sarah Silverman, and Debra Messing — not to mention political stars like Bernie Sanders, Al Franken, Cory Booker, Elizabeth Warren, first lady Michelle Obama, and former president Bill Clinton. Trump was remorsefully unimpressed with the star power:

The numbers aren't in yet for Night 2 of the Democratic convention, but Trump may be a little peeved that on Monday, the Democrats pulled in millions of more viewers than tuned in for Night 1 of the Republican National Convention. As for set design, beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but you can't say that the Democrats weren't at least inspired by Trump's aesthetic. Peter Weber

1:52 a.m. ET

Youree Dell Harris, best known for portraying the Jamaican psychic Miss Cleo in late-1990s infomercials, died in Palm Beach, Florida, of cancer. She was 53.

Born in Los Angles, Harris was hired by the Psychic Readers Network in the late 1990s to play Miss Cleo. The infomercials featured her catchphrase "Call me now!" and claimed the readings were free. In fact, the Federal Trade Commission said, the toll-free number clients called was actually a 900 number, and they were charged $4.99 a minute; nearly six million people were charged on average $60 per call. The parent company of the Psychic Readers Network reached a settlement with customers in 2002, and with the Miss Cleo character retired, Harris went on to provide the voice for a character in the video game Grand Theft Auto: Vice City.

After Harris came out as a lesbian, she became a gay rights activist, and she also appeared in the 2014 documentary Hotline. "She was smart as a whip and very intuitive," Tony Shaff, the film's producer, told USA Today. "There was so much negativity surrounding psychic hotlines that she wanted to tell her personal story." Catherine Garcia

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