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February 3, 2016
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On Tuesday, the House voted, 241-186, to override President Obama's veto of a bill that would gut the Affordable Care Act and end federal funding of Planned Parenthood, falling nearly 50 votes short of the two-thirds majority Republicans needed to thwart Obama's veto. Republican leaders were expecting the defeat, but they painted the exercise as a selling point for electing a Republican president in November. "The president is the only person standing in the way of what the American people want," said Rep. Tom Price (R-Ga.), "so our job now is to stand up for them, to demonstrate for them who is on their side."

Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.), the ranking Democrat on Price's House Budget Committee, said it was fitting that the vote was on Groundhog Day, since House Republicans had voted to repeal ObamaCare 62 times before and voted 11 other times to defund Planned Parenthood. "It probably breaks all records in wasting taxpayer time and money," he said before the vote. "This is a futile gesture, part of an obsession to try to undo affordable care for 22 million Americans, and it's not going to happen." Peter Weber

1:58 a.m. ET
Facebook.com/LindseySnell

The U.S. State Department confirmed on Wednesday an American journalist has been detained by Turkish authorities.

Lindsey Snell, a freelancer covering the Middle East and North Africa whose work has appeared on ABC News, Yahoo News, and Vice, was detained on August 7 after she crossed the border from Syria to Turkey, NBC News reports. She has been charged with violating a military zone. State Department spokesman John Kirby said consular officers last visited with her at a prison in Hatay province on August 26, and an official told NBC News the government's goal is to get her to a safe location. The governor of Hatay, Ercan Topaca, told the state-run Anadolu Agency that a "U.S. journalist was captured while she was trying to cross the border illegally; she was taken to court and remanded. The trial phase is ongoing. For now, we do not know if she is a spy or not."

In early August, Snell wrote on her Facebook page that she had been kidnapped by members of Jabhat Fateh al Sham, the group that was once called Jabhat al Nusra and affiliated with al Qaeda. Snell, a Muslim, said she had permission to film in their area and was "staying with the family of one of their recent martyrs," but was still abducted. She was held in a "cave prison," she wrote, but because her captors let her use her phone, she was able to plan an escape. Catherine Garcia

1:40 a.m. ET

For anyone wondering whether Donald Trump is "softening" or "hardening" his views on immigration, he came down solidly on the "hardening" side in Wednesday night's speech in Phoenix, Arizona. The softening talk appeared briefly after Trump and the Republican National Committee met on Aug. 20 with Trump's National Hispanic Advisory Council, and at least one of the members of that group, Jacob Monty, dropped out after Trump's immigration speech. "I was a strong supporter of Donald Trump when I believed he was going to address the immigration problem realistically and compassionately," Monty told Politico. "What I heard today was not realistic and not compassionate."

Another high profile Latino Trump supporter, Alfonso Aguilar, the president of the Latino Partnership for Conservative Principles, was similarly unimpressed, telling Politico, "I can tell you there’s a real possibility we will withdraw support from Donald Trump because of that disappointing speech." This is only two big Latino former Trump backers, but Trump doesn't have that many to spare, and there may be more to come.

On the other hand, the people who supported Trump's earlier hard line on immigration — Team Hardening — were pleased, including the crew at Breitbart News and a certain U.S. Senate candidate from Louisiana:

Like beauty, "excellent" is in the eye of the beholder. Peter Weber

1:17 a.m. ET

When you don't have an address but really want to mail a letter to someone, you have to improvise.

A tourist who stayed at a horse farm in Bú∂ardalur, Iceland, did not have the property's exact address, so on an envelope drew a detailed map and wrote (in English) the information she did have: "Country: Iceland. City: Bú∂ardalur. Name: A horse farm with an Icelandic/Danish couple and three kids and a lot of sheep!" She added: "The Danish woman works in a supermarket in Bú∂ardalur." The letter was mailed from Reykjavik, and eventually made it to Rebecca Cathrine Kaadu Ostenfeld, the woman who owns the horse farm, the BBC reports.

The delivery was made earlier this year, but the story went viral this week after it was featured on Reddit. There's no explanation on how the post office was able to track down Ostenfeld, but the Icelandic news website Skessuhorn thinks it worked out because "anything is possible in Iceland." Catherine Garcia

12:27 a.m. ET

Maybe something was lost in translation. Maybe somebody is lying. Or maybe Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto and Donald Trump are being super precise in their language. But there seems to be a dispute over whether or not Trump and Nieto discussed who will pay for Trump's hypothetical wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. At a joint news conference, Trump said no. "We did discuss the wall, we didn't discuss payment of the wall," he told reporters. "That will be for a later date."

Nieto did not disagree with Trump at the time, but a spokesman said soon after that the Mexican president made clear to Trump that Mexico is still not building that wall. On Twitter, Nieto tweeted that "at the beginning of the conversation with Donald Trump I made it clear that Mexico will not pay for the wall.

Then, on TV Wednesday night, Nieto said that he had been clear and emphatic with Trump that Mexico will not pay for the wall.

Now, there is a way that both sides can be right. Nieto spokesman Eduardo Sanchez told The Wall Street Journal's David Luhnow that Trump did not respond when Nieto told him no, so there was "no discussion" and Trump wasn't lying. A warm-up act at Trump's Arizona rally, Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, said he doesn't really care who pays for the wall. Trump, in his Arizona speech, was emphatic that, despite what Nieto might have told him, "Mexico will pay, 100 percent. They don't know it yet, but they're gonna pay for it."

This is all assuming that Trump wins the election and convinces Congress (or, even less likely, Mexico) to fork over tens of billions of dollars for Trump's "great wall." BuzzFeed political editor Katherine Miller put it this way:

Discussing the Mexico City trip beforehand, a Trump adviser told CNN, "You've just got to throw in a little theater now and then." Mission accomplished: Trump sure left us with a whodunit.

12:06 a.m. ET

Emboldened by his quick trip south of the border, Donald Trump came up with a new slogan that he immediately squeezed onto a hat for Rudy Giuliani to wear during his immigration policy rally.

It's no longer just about making America great again — as Giuliani's white hat declared, it's time to "Make Mexico Great Again Also."

He wasn't alone in making this bold fashion statement — immigration hardliner and conservative Republican Sen. Jeff Sessions of Alabama also modeled a "Make Mexico Great Again Also" cap, the sequel to the "most popular product in America."

A campaign official told Joshua Green of Bloomberg Businessweek that Trump came up with the slogan on his own. Watch out, Canada — you're next, also! Catherine Garcia

August 31, 2016
Ralph Freso/Getty Images

Donald Trump delivered a speech on immigration Wednesday night in Phoenix, and promised that if his 10-point plan is followed, "peace, law, justice, and prosperity will prevail."

The Republican presidential nominee arrived in Arizona hours after his meeting with Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto. Trump said the pair had a "thoughtful and substantive conversation, and it will go on for awhile, and in the end, we're all gonna win, both countries." In Phoenix, Trump spent more than an hour discussing immigration, visas, the "beautiful" wall he will build, and assimilation (sometimes, he said, it "doesn't work out" for people, and it is "our right" to choose immigrants the "likeliest to thrive and flourish and love us"). "There is only one core issue in the immigration debate, and that issue is the wellbeing of the American people," he said. The audience cheered for him throughout the speech, chanting at times "USA! USA!" but did boo sanctuary cities, San Francisco, the media, any Democrat named, and global warming (not because it's bad, but because scientists say it exists).

Trump went through his 10-step policy to combat illegal immigration and strengthen legal immigration, including his famous call for a "great wall along the southern border. Mexico will pay, 100 percent. They don't know it yet, but they're gonna pay for it." This wall, he continued, will be built on "Day 1" of a Trump presidency, and will be "impenetrable, tall, powerful, [and] beautiful" with "above and below ground sensors, towers, aerial surveillance." Also on Day 1, in fact in his "first hour in office," he would make sure that "criminal aliens" are deported, Trump said, and he would "issue detainers for illegal immigrants arrested for any crime whatsoever."

Trump went on to say "there will be no amnesty," and he would triple the number of Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers and start a new deportation task force, which he suggested could possibly also deport his opponent, American citizen Hillary Clinton. He also said that anyone who "illegally crosses the border will be detained until they are removed out of our country" and he would "cancel unconstitutional executive orders and enforce all immigration orders." When it comes to legal immigration, Trump said he wants to see "extreme vetting," and new screening tests "to make sure those we are admitting to our country share our values and love our people." He would suspend immigration from Syria and Libya, instead setting up safe zones in their countries.

At the end of the speech, Trump was joined onstage by several supporters whose relatives were killed by undocumented immigrants, and he told the audience his hope is to unite the country and see "illegal immigration a memory of the past." Catherine Garcia

August 31, 2016
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All five people on board two small aircraft that collided in midair over Alaska on Wednesday died, the Alaskan National Guard said.

Officials say the collision took place shortly before 11 a.m., about 60 miles north of Bethel. The planes involved were a Hageland Aviation Cessna 208 Caravan with three people on board and a Renfro's Alaska Adventures Piper PA-18 Super Cub with two people. Medics were flown in on helicopters, and found no survivors at the scene. An investigation is now underway. Catherine Garcia

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