FOLLOW THE WEEK ON FACEBOOK
March 14, 2016
Sean Rayford/Getty Images

It's not exactly a shocker that Hillary Clinton is the most feminine sounding candidate according to Textio, a company that uses software to evaluate language. However, the second most feminine sounding candidate might be something of a surprise: Donald Trump.

Using phrases like "my beautiful family" and "lasting relationships," analysts found that Trump's speech tended toward the feminine, according to statistically significant responses to words by the different sexes. Trump, however, also skews very masculine in his speech, using insults like "moron" or phrases like "absolutely destroy."

The most masculine candidate overall, however, is Ted Cruz, who prefers "totally destroy" as well as "relentless" and "hunt down." Marco Rubio, on the other hand, talks about actual women the least of any candidate — he brings up men 18 times as often as he does women. According to The Upshot, "Sometimes it seems the only woman Mr. Rubio tells stories about is his mother."

But of course, it is not just about what you say. How you say words matters too — and Trump gets high marks there as well. Even higher than Clinton, in fact:

Software is imperfect at understanding human language because it misses important clues like gestures, tone of voice and facial expressions, said Robin Lakoff, professor emerita of linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley, who in 1975 published a book, Language and Woman's Place, that led to a variety of research on language and gender.

Based on these nonverbal cues, she concluded that Mr. Trump was the most feminine speaker of all the candidates, even more than Mrs. Clinton — he gestures a lot, is very expressive, poses statements as questions and repeatedly explains himself, all of which are commonly feminine, she said. [The New York Times]

Read more about how the candidates speak in The New York Times. Jeva Lange

6:28 p.m. ET
Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley (R) was confirmed Tuesday as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, following a 96-4 Senate vote.

She is expected to announce her resignation as governor soon, with Lt. Gov Henry McMaster (R) replacing Haley for the final two years of her term. For her new job, Haley will move to New York City and get a pay raise to $187,000 a year, up from $106,078 annually as governor. Catherine Garcia

5:46 p.m. ET
Win McNamee/Getty Images

On Tuesday, the House voted 238-183 in favor of legislation that would prevent the use of federal funding for abortions. If passed, the measure would make the Hyde Amendment — currently a rider routinely added onto annual funding bills that prevents the use of federal funds to pay for abortion except in extreme cases — into a permanent law.

The legislation would also "block tax credits for some people and businesses buying abortion coverage under former President Barack Obama's health care law," The Associated Press reported. It does include an exception for instances of rape or incest, or if the mother's life is in jeopardy.

Democrats argue the bill disproportionately affects low-income women. Refinery29 reported that "for the 1 in 6 reproductive-age women who rely on Medicaid for health insurance, the Hyde Amendment keeps them from accessing safe medical care."

The bill next moves to the Senate, where it will need 60 votes to pass. Becca Stanek

5:24 p.m. ET
Aaron Davidson/Getty Images for A24

The Oscars aren't quite so white this year.

On Tuesday, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced its nominees for the 2017 Academy Awards. In doing so, the Academy also debuted its largest-ever number of black nominees, The New York Times reports. Three films led by black actors — Moonlight, Hidden Figures, and Fences — all scored Best Picture nominations, while six black actors were nominated for lead or supporting roles. Moonlight director Barry Jenkins and four black documentarians also secured nominations.

The Oscars have traditionally been dominated by white actors — a controversy that came to a head in 2015, when the nominee line-up triggered the #OscarsSoWhite hashtag calling out the Academy for its not-so-diverse nominations. The hashtag returned in 2016 when things did not sufficiently improve.

But this year, it seems like the Academy may have listened to all those complaints. You can see the full list of nominees at the Academy's website. Kathryn Krawczyk

4:37 p.m. ET

Amid reports President Donald Trump's administration is clamping down on various federal agencies' social media use, Badlands National Park decided to go ahead and tweet about climate change anyway. The official Twitter account of the national park posted several tweets Tuesday afternoon, warning about the growing amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and ocean acidity:

National Parks News then decided to join the rebellion:

Tweeting about carbon dioxide in the atmosphere might not seem all that bold at first glance, but the posts came on the heels of the Trump administration strictly prohibiting employees of the EPA, HHS, USDA, and NIH from posting on social media, talking to reporters, or publishing press releases and blog posts. Trump's administration has also been notoriously hesitant to embrace the reality of climate change.

On top of that, the National Park Service was temporarily banned from Twitter over the weekend for re-tweeting two tweets from its official account on Inauguration Day that were "considered unsympathetic to President Trump," The Washington Post reported. The NPS apologized and promised to stick to sharing "the beauty and history of our national parks" after getting its Twitter privileges back.

Maybe Badlands didn't get the memo — or maybe America's national parks are going rogue. Becca Stanek

3:42 p.m. ET
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Now that President Trump has the nuclear codes in his hands, two Democratic lawmakers are hoping to make it a little harder for him to actually use them. On Tuesday, Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.) and Rep. Ted Lieu (D-Calif.) reintroduced a bill that would prevent Trump from launching a nuclear strike if Congress had not declared war. As it stands now, the president holds the right to launch a preemptive nuclear strike, a policy both Markey and Lieu oppose no matter who the president may be.

Markey and Lieu first tried to introduce this bill in September, after Trump suggested at a presidential debate that he couldn't "take anything off the table" when it came to nuclear weapons, including first strike. But now that Trump has actually been sworn into office, Markey and Lieu say this bill is more pressing than ever.

"It is a frightening reality that the U.S. now has a commander-in-chief who has demonstrated ignorance of the nuclear triad, stated his desire to be 'unpredictable' with nuclear weapons, and as president-elect was making sweeping statements about U.S. nuclear policy over Twitter," Lieu said in a statement. He urged Congress to pass a "system of checks and balances" to be "applied to the potentially civilization-ending threat of nuclear war." Becca Stanek

2:38 p.m. ET

The Senate confirmation hearing for Rep. Mick Mulvaney (R-S.C.) took a rather odd turn Tuesday when Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) proceeded to pull up photographs comparing the inauguration crowds of former President Barack Obama and President Donald Trump.

"Which crowd is larger?" Merkley asked Mulvaney, Trump's nominee to lead the Office of Management and Budget.

"Senator, if you would allow me to give the disclaimer that I'm not really sure how this ties to OMB, I'll be happy to answer your question, which is from that picture it does appear that the [Obama crowd] is bigger than the [Trump crowd]," Mulvaney replied.

Merkley then got to his point: "The president disagreed … he said, 'It's a lie' … The reason I'm raising this is because budget often contains varied deceptions. You and I talked in my office about the 'magic asterisk.' This is an example of where the president's team — on something very simple and straightforward — wants to embrace a fantasy rather than a reality." Watch the full line of inquiry below. Jeva Lange

2:18 p.m. ET

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer doubled down on President Donald Trump's false assertion that millions of illegal immigrants voted in the 2016 U.S. election. "The claim, which [Trump] has made before on Twitter, has been judged untrue by numerous fact-checkers," The New York Times wrote of the statement, going as far as to label the accusation a "lie." Trump nevertheless repeated the claim Monday at a reception with congressional leaders.

Spicer was asked directly about voter fraud during his White House press briefing Tuesday, and replied "the president does believe that … based on studies and evidence people have presented to him." Spicer did not elaborate on what those studies are or what the evidence might be. Watch below. Jeva Lange

See More Speed Reads