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January 12, 2018

A growing number of pregnant Russian women have been traveling to Miami to give birth, with the wealthier ones buying birth tourism packages and those of more modest means putting together DIY packages. Giving birth in the U.S., and Miami in particular, is a status symbol in Moscow, NBC News reports, and the big draw is birthright citizenship. All children born in the U.S. are U.S. citizens. "The child gets a lifelong right to live and work and collect benefits in the U.S." NBC News says. "And when they turn 21 they can sponsor their parents' application for an American green card."

President Trump, a critic of birthright citizenship, has been insisting on getting rid of such "chain migration" in immigration talks going on in Washington. But as The Daily Beast reported last year, Trump-branded condos in Miami, especially its Sunny Isles Beach area — dubbed "Little Russia" — are especially popular birth tourism bases for women who can afford the rent. Some Russian birth tourism outfits tout the Trump name in their packages. "There is no indication that Trump or the Trump Organization is profiting directly from birth tourism," NBC News says, though The Daily Beast notes that Trump's company "does benefit from Russian patronage of the nearby Trump International Beach Resort."

Birth tourism is perfectly legal — for now — as long as the birth tourists don't lie on their immigration or insurance forms, and California is a popular destination for Chinese mothers-to-be — as Jeb Bush awkwardly highlighted in 2015. There are no official numbers for how many foreign women come to the U.S. to give birth to U.S. citizens each year, but Florida says the number of births there by all foreign nationals who live outside the U.S. has spiked 200 percent since 2000. Peter Weber

8:39 a.m. ET

President Trump on Sunday revived a week of controversy by referring to Russian election interference as "a big hoax." "So President Obama knew about Russia before the Election," Trump tweeted. "Why didn't he do something about it? Why didn't he tell our campaign? Because it is all a big hoax."

The tweet came after Trump spent days reassuring Americans that he accepts intelligence agencies' conclusion that Moscow meddled in the 2016 campaign, despite indicating after his summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin that he believed Putin's denials over the conclusions of U.S. intelligence services. Earlier Sunday, Trump argued without evidence that newly released documents confirm "that the Department of 'Justice' and FBI misled the courts" that approved warrants to wiretap his onetime campaign adviser Carter Page. Harold Maass

7:48 a.m. ET
Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Iranian leaders are taking President Trump's threats in stride.

Trump on Sunday night sent a tweet warning Iranian President Hassan Rouhani to "NEVER, EVER THREATEN THE UNITED STATES AGAIN," but Iranian state media dismissed the tweet Monday as a "passive reaction," Talking Points Memo reports.

The all-caps tweet was in response to Rouhani's remark that "peace with Iran is the mother of all peace, and war with Iran is the mother of all wars," with Rouhani on Sunday arguing that attempts to undermine Tehran among the Iranian public would not be successful. Rouhani reportedly told a local newspaper that Trump had better not "play with the lion's tail," but political analysts said the war of words doesn't signal a real desire to escalate conflict. Iranian lawmaker Heshmatollah Falahatpisheh said that the harsh words are made public because the two leaders are currently forced to "express themselves through speeches since diplomatic channels are closed."

Trump, writing that Iran would suffer untold consequences if it continued to threaten the U.S., said "WE ARE NO LONGER A COUNTRY THAT WILL STAND FOR YOUR DEMENTED WORDS OF VIOLENCE & DEATH. BE CAUTIOUS!" Read more at Talking Points Memo. Summer Meza

2:12 a.m. ET

Mr. Faulkner's Old Fashioned Hot Dogs is one of Minneapolis' newest eating destinations — and it's run by a 13-year-old.

Jaequan Faulkner first started selling hot dogs in front of his house two years ago, and decided to try it again this summer so he could make money for new school clothes. Someone called the city's health department and complained about the stand, which did not have a permit, but instead of shutting him down right away, officials worked with Faulkner to get his stand up to code. "They're actually the ones who are helping me," he told KARE. "It makes me feel kind of — not kind of — really proud that people know what I'm doing."

The Minneapolis Health Department, Minneapolis Promise Zone, and Northside Economic Opportunity Network (NEON) are all guiding Faulkner, working with him on everything from pricing to marketing. He now has a tent, hand washing station, and thermometer to check the temperature of his food, plus employees from the health department pooled their money to help him cover the $87 permit. Faulkner is looking forward to growing his business, and loves making people smile. "It puts pride in me to see that I'm doing something good for the community," he told KARE. Catherine Garcia

1:43 a.m. ET
Pedro Pardo/AFP/Getty Images

Earlier this month, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, Mexico's president-elect, sent President Trump a letter, calling on him to resume NAFTA negotiations and work with Mexico and Central American countries to stem migration.

On Sunday, Lopez Obrador's proposed foreign minister read the letter during a press conference. The missive urged Trump to join Lopez Obrador for an initiative to combat poverty and violence in Central America, two of the issues that cause people to flee to the United States, and discussed setting up a fund for development in the region. It also said Lopez Obrador's transition team will work with the current Mexican government on NAFTA negotiations. Lopez Obrador will be inaugurated on Dec. 1. Catherine Garcia

1:17 a.m. ET
Cole Burston/AFP/Getty Images

A gunman opened fire in a neighborhood in Toronto's east end on Sunday night, killing one person and injuring at least 13 others, Toronto Police Chief Mark Saunders said.

The shooter was killed "in an exchange of gunfire," Saunders told reporters, and "a young girl, I believe eight or nine years old, is in critical condition." The shooting took place near Danforth and Pape avenues, on "one of the busiest streets in the country," Saunders said. Toronto Mayor John Tory told reporters police have "not drawn any conclusions about what happened here or why."

Witness Jim Melis told The Globe and Mail he was driving down the street when he saw a white man wearing a black hat and bandana start firing into a cafe. Another witness, John Aruldason, said there were lots of people eating out in restaurants, and patios were full. "No one thinks this would happen in Toronto," he added. "People were slow to react — it wasn't believable."

This is a developing story and will be updated as more information becomes available. Catherine Garcia

12:33 a.m. ET
Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

On Sunday night, President Trump tweeted an all-caps message to Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, seemingly in response to a warning Rouhani issued earlier in the day.

Rouhani declared during a meeting of Iranian diplomats that "America should know that peace with Iran is the mother of all peace, and war with Iran is the mother of all wars." Trump directly addressed Rouhani in his tweet, saying, "To Iranian President Rouhani: NEVER, EVER THREATEN THE UNITED STATES AGAIN OR YOU WILL SUFFER CONSEQUENCES THE LIKES OF WHICH FEW THROUGHOUT HISTORY HAVE EVER SUFFERED BEFORE. WE ARE NO LONGER A COUNTRY THAT WILL STAND FOR YOUR DEMENTED WORDS OF VIOLENCE & DEATH. BE CAUTIOUS!" Catherine Garcia

12:12 a.m. ET
Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

It took awhile to get right, but now, Dooma Wendschuh's beer brewed from cannabis no longer tastes like "rotten broccoli."

Wendschuh is an entrepreneur who moved to Ontario, Canada, from Miami in 2016, and is developing what he says is the world's first beer brewed from cannabis. He started Province Brands in order to ride the pot wave; on October 17, Canada will legalize marijuana for recreational use, with edibles expected to follow next year. Most cannabis beer on the market was brewed from barley and infused with marijuana oil, he told The Guardian, but "that's not what we do. Our beer is brewed from the stalks, stem, and roots of the cannabis plant."

To get the beer to lose its broccoli taste, Wendschuh hired a chemist, and he has since come up with a concoction using hops, water, yeast, and cannabis, which yields a non-alcoholic, gluten-free beer that gets you high. "The flavor is dry, savory, less sweet than a typical beer flavor," he told The Guardian. "The beer hits you very quickly, which is not common for a marijuana edible." This beer is also environmentally friendly, since roots, stocks, and stems are typically tossed. "We take them off the grower's hands, saving them the cost of hiring a licensed disposal company to dispose of them," Wendschuh said. Catherine Garcia

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