The renewed relevance of neoconservatism

America can and must remain a force for good in the world. Instead we're speaking rudely and carrying a wiffle bat.

President Trump and Vladimir Putin.
(Image credit: Illustrated | dikobraziy/iStock, Chris McGrath/Getty Images, jessicahyde/iStock, Wikimedia Commons)

Does America even want to be a superpower anymore?

Since the end of the Second World War, the United States has played a dominant role in geopolitics. But today, as President Trump works to reorient the Republican Party around his "America First" philosophy, and simultaneously suffers a variety of widely criticized stumbles and spats in foreign affairs, we face an alarming possibility: Maybe Americans have grown tired of being a force for good in the world. Maybe they've become cynical about the very possibility. Maybe we no longer have a party willing to articulate and defend a principled vision for the exercise of American influence.

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