Maybe we were wrong about the SAT

What test-optional college admissions really means

Photo collage of exam papers, students and a classroom on orange background
Have testing critics "drawn the wrong battle lines"?
(Image credit: Getty Images)

One of the changes to education that seems to have carried over from the Covid pandemic is a shift toward a "test-optional" college admissions process that de-emphasizes SAT and ACT scores. Many colleges and universities initially said the change was temporary, but plenty continue to keep the test-optional policy in place years later. Critics of standardized testing "hailed the change as a victory for equity in higher education," David Leonhardt pointed out in The New York Times. Still, more recently, "a growing number of experts and university administrators wonder whether the switch has been a mistake."

SAT scores are 'more reliable' than grades for gauging success

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