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May 16, 2019

Alabama's near-complete abortion ban was sponsored in the State Senate by Clyde Chambliss, a Republican lawmaker who said he's "not smart enough to be pregnant" and admitted that fertilized eggs in labs aren't banned in his "fetal personhood" bill because they're "not in a woman. She's not pregnant." Chambliss "really is dumb," Samantha Bee said on Wednesday's Full Frontal, soon after Alabama's female governor signed his bill into law, but Alabama isn't the only state trying to effectively ban abortion.

"There have been more six-week abortion bill than Godfather movies, so I guess men really don't love anything more than policing women's bodies," Bee said. "The one thing all these bills have in common is that the people writing them have no f---ing idea how the internal reproductive system works. That's why I'm going to do something that should have been done decades ago — I'm going to teach sex ed to senators."

And while some of Bee's class is NSFW, she really does teach. Her lessons include everything from the helpful "We don't know we're pregnant the moment it happens" to the very specific: "You can't reimplant an ectopic pregnancy, you old, tragic Kenneth from 30 Rock." There's "Miscarriage is incredibly common" and the useful "Birth control and morning-after pills aren't abortion" — "Neither of them causes abortions; banning them sure does, though," she added.

But there's one lesson "every single legislator should learn before writing abortion laws," even those on the left, Bee said: "What even is an abortion?" and as importantly, what isn't an abortion, specifically anything that happens when a baby is full-term. "That would be homicide," she said. "Look, there are plenty of crazy positions on the left — for example, I believe the term 'manatee' is too gendered — but no one is advocating for legalizing baby-murder." Watch below, especially if you're a senator. Peter Weber

7:59 p.m.

Feeling particularly feisty on Wednesday, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) let the world know exactly how he feels about Attorney General William Barr and Rudy Giuliani.

"I think Bill Barr has all the duplicity of Rudy Giuliani without all the good looks and general likability of Rudy Giuliani," Schiff said during the Center for American Progress 2019 Ideas Conference. "The most dangerous thing, I think, that Bill Barr has done is basically say that a president under investigation can make the investigation go away if he thinks its unfair which, by the way, means the other 14 investigations firmed up through other offices he can also make go away."

Barr, Schiff added, acts more like "a personal attorney" for Trump, and needs to resign. Barr refused to turn over documents related to Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation and skipped a hearing before the House Intelligence Committee last week, and earlier Wednesday, the panel postponed a vote on holding him in contempt of Congress. "Department of Justice has accepted our offer of a first step towards compliance with our subpoena, and this week will begin turning over to the committee 12 categories of counterintelligence and foreign intelligence materials as part of an initial rolling production," Schiff said in a statement. Catherine Garcia

7:06 p.m.

A new study warns that if nothing is done to curb carbon emissions, sea levels could rise by more than six feet by the end of the century, flooding major cities — including Shanghai, Miami, and Mumbai – and displacing about 200 million people.

As the Earth gets warmer, ice sheets are melting faster than previously predicted, the study's scientists said. Co-author Robert Kopp, director of the Institute of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Studies at Rutgers University, told NBC News there are many uncertainties when it comes to the ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica. For the study, 22 climate experts were asked to estimate the ice sheets' effect on sea level rise if temperatures rose by 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit and 9 degrees Fahrenheit, which is "consistent with unchecked emissions growth."

This was the worst-case scenario, with scientists predicting sea levels rising by more than six feet by 2100, permanently flooding 700,000 square miles of land. If the temperature only rose by 3.6 degrees, melting ice sheets would add about two-and-a-half feet to sea level rise. Kopp said not all hope is lost, and "changing the course of emissions really can significantly affect this issue over the next 80 years." The study was published Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Catherine Garcia

5:12 p.m.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and National Security Adviser John Bolton are generally aligned when it comes to U.S. foreign policy, but that doesn't mean they get along.

Four sources familiar with their relationship told CNN that their stark personality differences and professional styles have caused a rift between the two, which has also been exacerbated by President Trump's "erratic behavior and lack of foreign policy experience." Pompeo, the State Department, and the National Security Council have all dismissed the claims.

But CNN's sources said that Pompeo is not a fan of Bolton's "calculating methods." Bolton often circumvents Pompeo to interact directly with the president, the CIA, and Congress. For example, during a debate over North Korea, Bolton reportedly left Pompeo off messages he sent to the CIA, which included a list of questions he wanted answered, a source within the intelligence community said. Pompeo, who has led negotiations with North Korea, was reportedly not pleased with being left in the dark. Bolton also reportedly has his deputy, Allison Hooker, call up the CIA ahead of meetings with Trump, allowing him to gather intel and keep that information to himself.

Pompeo is not alone when it comes to disapproving of Bolton's workplace behavior. One of CNN's sources, who describes themselves as Bolton's friend, said the national security adviser is "overreaching" and not running the NSC properly. "There is a real feeling outside of the national security council, across the board, that John has his own agenda and is undercutting the president's policies," another source close to the White House said.

Trump, too, reportedly has some issues with Bolton, though that has less to do with the way Bolton operates and more with how he's perceived. The president apparently gets annoyed by Bolton's public profile, especially when he's giving a speech or tweeting because it takes attention away from him. Read more at CNN. Tim O'Donnell

5:11 p.m.

Much like the Democratic presidential primaries, NASA is collecting a long list of names for 2020.

"Travelers" can have their names sent to Mars during NASA's 2020 space launch. The names will be stenciled in tiny letters on chips attached to a rover that will track any signs of life on Mars, the agency said. Researchers are calling the rover a "robotic scientist" that will collect samples and analyze climate on the red planet.

"As we get ready to launch this historic Mars mission, we want everyone to share in this journey of exploration," said Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator for NASA's Science Mission Directorate. "It's an exciting time for NASA, as we embark on this voyage to answer profound questions about our neighboring planet, and even the origins of life itself."

Although no humans will be onboard, space-lovers can earn "frequent flyer" miles for the trip and any other mission they choose to submit a name for. Participants will also receive a souvenir boarding pass for participating in NASA's launch.

The rover is slated to reach Mars in February 2021. Participants can still add their names to NASA's list here. Tatyana Bellamy-Walker

5:07 p.m.

Democrats just scored their second subpoena victory of the week.

On Monday, a U.S. District Court judge denied President Trump's request to block the House Oversight Committee's subpoena of his financial records from his accounting firm. And on Wednesday, another judge did basically the same thing, ruling against Trump's suit to block a House subpoena of his financial record from Deutsche Bank and Capitol One.

Last month, the House Financial Services and Intelligence committees subpoenaed the banks for several years of Trump's financial records. Trump, his businesses, and his family immediately sued the banks to stop them from complying. But on Wedenesday, Judge Edgardo Ramos of the Southern District of New York said the subpoenas were broad, but decided they were "clearly pertinent" to Congress' goals, CNN reports. Ramos added that he expects the banks to comply with the subpoenas shortly.

Deutsche Bank has spent years loaning to Trump and his businesses, and said it "would comply with whatever the court ultimately decided," The New York Times notes. Like they did after Tuesday's ruling, though, Trump's lawyers will likely appeal the Wednesday decision. Kathryn Krawczyk

4:08 p.m.

Washington has become the first state to legalize human composting as an alternative to burial or cremation after Gov. Jay Inslee signed the bill into law on Tuesday.

The law also legalizes alkaline hydrolysis, "a process that breaks down bodies using lye and heat," HuffPost explained. Alkaline hydrolysis is legal in some other states, including California, Idaho, and Maine. Both processes will be legal in Washington starting on May 1, 2020.

These alternative methods have been touted by advocates as being more eco-friendly than traditional burial or cremation. As much as "a metric ton of CO2" could be saved by choosing the process of human composting instead of traditional methods, says Seattle company Recompose.

After the human composting process is complete — which would take about a month — the deceased's loved ones can take the remains home "to grow a tree or a garden," Recompose's website states.

It's possible that Recompose will be the first of many Washington companies to offer this service, though it's unclear exactly how many Washingtonians will decide to avail themselves of this new opportunity.

Read more at HuffPost. Shivani Ishwar

3:58 p.m.

Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Ben Carson is desperately trying to explain that stunning "Oreo" gaffe.

Carson while testifying before Congress on Tuesday was asked by Rep. Katie Porter (D-Calif.) about REOs, a real-estate term, but responded, "An Oreo?" Porter proceeded to explain to Carson what an REO is as he appeared to not know what the last letter stood for.

Carson in two interviews on Wednesday discussed this viral moment, first on Fox Business, where he claimed he "was having difficulty hearing" Porter. "Of course, I'm very familiar with foreclosed properties and with REOs, have read extensively about them," he said.

In fact, Carson suggested he knows much more about the topic than the Democratic lawmaker because "I suspect when Katie Porter was an expert in this area, things were very different," saying he invited her to speak with his staff so "she would then be able to understand what's going on."

That doesn't explain why Carson struggled to recall what the 'O' in 'REO' stands for, though. To address that point, Carson said in another interview with The Hill, "We throw around acronyms all the time, particularly in government. And you don't really even think about, 'what do the letters mean?' But you know what the thing is. Of course you know what an REO is."

Carson after the gaffe on Tuesday tried to make light of the mistake by posting a photo of himself with a box of Oreos and sending some to Porter's office. She didn't find that very funny, though, telling MSNBC that Carson should not be in his position and that "we're all losing by not having competent, strong, effective, intelligent leadership at HUD." Brendan Morrow

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