Trump riffs on economy, 9/11, AIDS vaccines, and school choice during speech about police reform

Donald Trump.
(Image credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

President Trump spoke from the White House Rose Garden on Tuesday to address his executive order on police form, but, as is so often the case, he eventually drifted off topic.

The president touched on subjects ranging from the bravery police officers showed during the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, which is related to the executive order insofar as it involves law enforcement, to the economy, which he boasted would rebound from the coronavirus pandemic.

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While expressing his optimism about the current global health crisis, he also discussed developments in AIDS research, inaccurately stating scientists had developed a vaccine for the virus, before seemingly catching the mistake.

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He also wandered onto the issue of school choice, calling it the "civil rights statement of the year" — a bold declaration considering the massive protests against police brutality and systemic racism that have swept the nation were the driving force behind the executive order.

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Tim O'Donnell

Tim is a staff writer at The Week and has contributed to Bedford and Bowery and The New York Transatlantic. He is a graduate of Occidental College and NYU's journalism school. Tim enjoys writing about baseball, Europe, and extinct megafauna. He lives in New York City.