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October 1, 2012

President Obama shakes hands with a young boy on Sept. 30 after arriving at McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas. While in town, Obama spoke at a campaign rally, urging Nevadans, who picked Obama over John McCain in 2008, to back him once again. Judging by this youngster's ear-to-ear toothless grin, if he were 18, he'd likely endorse giving the president four more years, too. The Week Staff

December 17, 2017

At 1:06 p.m. on Sunday, Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport went dark, after an electrical fire damaged two Georgia Power substation serving the airport, including its "redundant system" in case of power failure. Thousands of passengers at the world's busiest airport were trapped for hours on grounded airplanes, electrical trams between terminals, or in the dark airport, and the FAA quickly declared a ground stop at the airport, causing the cancelation of about 1,000 flights in and out of Atlanta on Sunday, with hundreds of flights scrapped for Monday, a week before Christmas.

Power crews restored electricity at Concourse F at 7:30 p.m., six and a half hours after the blackout began, and several other areas got power shortly before midnight. Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed said officials don't yet know what caused the fires, adding, "We certainly understand that the outage has caused frustration and anger and we are doing everything that we can to get folks back home right away."

CNN's Betsy Klein was stuck on a Delta airplane on the tarmac for seven hours, and she live-tweeted the experience. When she finally got off the plane at 9 p.m., she said, the airport was sweltering, nobody appeared to be in charge, and it was hard to find the exit — a trip that entailed a lot of walking, including up and down stalled escalators. She described people sleeping on baggage claim carousels and jockeying for power outlets.

Still, after seven hours on a packed plane, with no food or water for the last few hours, she was happy to finally deplane.

Hartsfield-Jackson International handled 104,171,935 passengers last year, USA Today reports, making it the most-used airport in the world. Peter Weber

December 17, 2017

Alabama's Senator-elect Doug Jones (D) made an appearance on CNN's State of the Union Sunday, talking with host Jake Tapper about his win at the polls this past week, his plans for his new role in Washington, and President Trump.

Jones broke with fellow Democrats who have said the president should resign because of sexual harassment accusations made against him. "Those allegations were made before the election, and so people had an opportunity to judge" last year, Jones said. "We need to move on and not get distracted by those issues."

Jones also indicated he won't be a strict party-line voter in the Senate given his may GOP constituents. "Now, don't expect me to vote solidly for Republicans or Democrats," he said. "I'm going to talk to people on both sides of the aisle, try to figure out what I think is in the best interest of my state and in the country."

Watch the full CNN interview below. Bonnie Kristian

December 17, 2017

White House Director of Legislative Affairs Marc Short had a testy conversation with NBC's Chuck Todd on Meet the Press Sunday in which he maintained the Trump administration is not internally debating whether to fire Special Counsel Robert Mueller from his probe into Russian election meddling efforts.

Todd raised the subject of emails the Trump transition team claims Mueller obtained unlawfully, but Short pleaded ignorance of the specifics of that situation. Instead, he argued the Russia investigation in general has been wasteful and unnecessary, which led to this rapid-fire exchange:

Todd: Ok, but is the president going to continue to cooperate?

Short: He is continuing to cooperate —

Todd: Or is he setting the stage —

Short: No, come on, Chuck.

Todd: For firing Bob Mueller?

Short: No, there's no conversation —

Todd: There's no way he's going to fire him?

Short: There's no conversation about that whatsoever in the White House, Chuck.

Todd: None whatsoever?

Short: You guys keep bringing that up. We have continued to cooperate in every single possible way with that investigation. [NBC]

Mueller's office denied accessing the emails unlawfully, stating it has always "secured either the account owner's consent or appropriate criminal process" when obtaining communications for the investigation. Watch an excerpt of the NBC interview below. Bonnie Kristian

December 17, 2017

Britain's Prince Harry has interviewed former President Obama for a radio show set to air later this month. Though recorded in September, the first teaser clip of the conversation was shared by Kensington Palace social media accounts Sunday.

Clocking in under a minute, the short video sees Obama and the prince joking as they prepare to begin their interview. "Do I have to speak faster, because I'm a slow speaker?" Obama asks. "Do I need a British accent?" Harry assures him that won't be necessary, but warns against leaving Obama's trademark "long pauses between the answers." Watch the teaser below. Bonnie Kristian

December 17, 2017
Pool/Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is not the only federal agency reportedly prohibited by the Trump White House from using words and phrases including "vulnerable," "entitlement," "diversity," "transgender," "fetus," "evidence-based," and "science-based."

The Washington Post reported Saturday evening that other divisions in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) have been given the same list of banned terms. Furthermore, staff at one agency were reportedly told to say "ObamaCare" instead of "Affordable Care Act," and ObamaCare "exchanges" instead of "marketplaces," while the State Department is calling sex education "sexual risk avoidance."

"People were surprised, people were not thrilled" about the directive, an unnamed HHS official told the Post. "We all kind of looked at each other and said, 'Oh, God.'" Bonnie Kristian

December 17, 2017

California's Thomas Fire grew to be the second-largest wildfire in the state's recorded history by Sunday morning. The blaze has burned more than 267,000 acres and is expected to grow larger than the all-time biggest California fire as soon as Sunday night thanks to continued high winds in Southern California. The fire now poses a serious threat to hundreds of homes in Montecito, a coastal town on the outskirts of Santa Barbara.

"When the [sundowner winds] surface in that area and the fire starts running down slopes, you are not going to stop it," said Mark Brown, of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. "And we are not going to stand in front of it and put firefighters in untenable situations."

See the fire's projected growth via the Los Angeles Times below. Bonnie Kristian

December 17, 2017

President Trump defended congressional Republicans' final tax bill while speaking with reporters Saturday, accusing Democrats of criticizing the plan without knowing what it will do. "It's going to be one of the great Christmas gifts to middle-income people," Trump said. "The Democrats have their sound bite, the standard sound bite before they even know what the bill is all about."

Trump also praised the strength of the economy, which he said will "start to rock" at up to 6 percent annual growth thanks to the tax bill and "what we've done with regulation and other things." Watch an excerpt of the president's comments via his Twitter account below. Bonnie Kristian

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