Daily Briefing

10 things you need to know today: March 22, 2016

Harold Maass
Dirk Waem/AFP/Getty Images


Explosions kill at least 26 in Brussels

Two explosions ripped through the check-in area of the Brussels airport early Tuesday, killing at least 11 people. Another blast hit a metro station, with Belgian metro operator STIB reporting at least 15 dead. Authorities shut down public transportation in the Belgian capital, and raised Belgium's threat level to maximum. The blasts came as counterterrorism officials search for an alleged accomplice of Paris terror-attack suspect Salah Abdeslam, who was arrested last week after a shootout in Brussels' Moenbeek suburb. "We were fearing terrorist attacks, and that has now happened," Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel said.


Security tightens around the world after Brussels attacks

Airports around the world are tightening security after two explosions hit the departure area of Belgium's Zaventem airport and a third rocked a metro station in central Brussels early Tuesday, reportedly the work of suicide bombers. Flights at Brussels airport were canceled immediately and the airport will remain closed until at least 6 a.m. Wednesday. Around Europe, security was tightened at Frankfurt Airport, London Heathrow, London Gatwick, and at all Italian airports. In New York, police are increasing their presence at airports, train stations, and major city landmarks.


Obama presses human rights in meeting with Raul Castro

President Obama had a historic meeting with Cuban President Raul Castro on Monday and said they had "frank and candid discussions" about the communist-ruled island's human rights record. Obama also said that he was confident that the U.S. trade embargo against Cuba does not "serve our interests" and would end, although he could not say when. Castro said the two former Cold War enemies could make faster progress toward normalizing relations if the U.S. lifted the "blockade," and returned the Guantanamo Bay naval base.


Trump critics split over Cruz and Kasich in Utah

Donald Trump enters Utah's Tuesday Republican caucus as the underdog, but a split among the anti-Trump crowd could work in his favor. A late surge by Ohio Gov. John Kasich could keep Sen. Ted Cruz from getting 50 percent support in the state, which would mean all three would get a share of the state's 40 delegates. Adding to the tension, Mitt Romney endorsed Cruz while former Utah Gov. Mike Leavitt backed Kasich. Trump has a commanding polling lead in winner-take-all Arizona, which also votes Tuesday.


Clinton blasts Trump ahead of Western contests

Hillary Clinton criticized Donald Trump — without naming him — in a speech to the American Israel Public Affairs Committee on Monday. The Republican presidential frontrunner has said he is neutral on Israel. Clinton said Israel's security is "non-negotiable," and the U.S. needs a president with "steady hands" who sees that. The shift of the Democratic frontrunner's attention to Trump came ahead of Tuesday's Democratic nominating contests. Clinton is the favorite in Arizona, but her rival, Sen. Bernie Sanders, has a shot in the Utah and Idaho caucuses.


Suu Kyi nominated to Myanmar cabinet position

Pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi has been nominated for a cabinet position in Myanmar (also known as Burma), according to a list of nominees submitted Tuesday by the country’s president-elect, Htin Kyaw. Suu Kyi, a winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, is barred from serving as president under a military-drafted constitution. Her National League for Democracy party dominated November elections, however, and has said she would give orders to the president, a close ally. Parliament is expected to confirm the nominees later this week.


FBI says it might be able to unlock San Bernardino shooter's iPhone without Apple's help

The Department of Justice filed a motion Monday to delay a Tuesday hearing on the FBI's demand for Apple's help to unlock an encrypted iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino shooters. Federal prosecutors said an "outside party" had shown the FBI a potential method for unlocking the iPhone without Apple's help, and the government needs time to determine whether it can use the method without compromising the phone's data. A DOJ spokeswoman said the government is "cautiously optimistic" it will work.


Indian Wells CEO steps down after comments spark outrage

Raymond Moore resigned as CEO of Indian Wells Tennis Garden and director of the BNP Paribas Open tennis tournament on Monday, a day after he sparked widespread outrage by saying women tennis players "ride on the coattails of the men." Serena Williams and others condemned the remarks as sexist, and Moore apologized. Larry Ellison, the tournament's owner, said Monday night that Moore had told him he was stepping down. Ellison praised the contributions of Williams and "so many other great women athletes" to tennis.


Apple unveils smaller iPhone and iPad Pro

Apple on Monday unveiled the iPhone SE, billing it as the "most powerful four-inch iPhone ever." The company's latest smartphone is aimed at customers who like the size of the older iPhone 5 but want the upgrades of the larger iPhone 6 family. Apple also used the event at its Cupertino, California, headquarters to launch a 9.7-inch iPad Pro with the same features of its 12.9-inch cousin along with some upgrades, such as better front- and back-facing cameras.


Jury awards Hulk Hogan another $25 million in sex-tape lawsuit

A Florida jury on Monday awarded Hulk Hogan $25 million in punitive damages in his lawsuit against Gawker Media for publishing clips of his sex tape in 2012. The jury hit Gawker with $15 million in damages, and its owner, Nick Denton, with $10 million. The decision brought total damages the 62-year-old former pro wrestler has been awarded to $140 million in his invasion-of-privacy lawsuit. A jury awarded Hogan, whose real name is Terry Bollea, $115 million in compensatory damages last week.

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