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January 11, 2016

The Golden Globes packed a lot in over the course of three hours — big wins for The Revenant, The Martian, and Mozart in the Jungle; an almost rumble between host Ricky Gervais and Mel Gibson; a standing ovation for Sylvester Stallone; Taraji P. Henson passing out cookies; a whole lot of cursing. Here are some of the other top moments from Sunday night:

Eva Longoria and America Ferrera teaching the Golden Globes a lesson

When the nominations were announced back in December, the Golden Globes mistakenly identified presenter America Ferrera — not once, but twice — as another Latina actress, Jane the Virgin's Gina Rodriguez. Not wanting to let the Hollywood Foreign Press Association off the hook, Ferrera and Eva Longoria humorously pointed out Sunday that Latina actresses are not interchangeable, and there are more than two or three out there.

The face Leonardo DiCaprio made when Lady Gaga ran into him

Lady Gaga was obviously very excited by her win (Best Actress in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television, for her role as the Countess in American Horror Story: Hotel), so excited in fact that she appeared to be in a trance as she made her way to the stage, running smack into Leonardo DiCaprio along the way. A startled DiCaprio made a weird face, and hundreds of GIFs were born.

Rachel Bloom's exuberant acceptance speech

Ricky Gervais may have said multiple times during the show that Golden Globe awards don't mean anything, but his jaded attitude didn't rub off on Rachel Bloom of Crazy Ex-Girlfriend. After winning the award for Best Actress in a Television Series, Comedy or Musical, a super excited Bloom spilled about how difficult it was to get Crazy Ex-Girlfriend on the air (it was rejected six times) and praised those who made it happen. For the Hollywood vets it may be just an award, but for Bloom, it obviously meant something.

Denzel Washington's wife asking him if he needed his glasses

When it came time to accept the Cecil B. DeMille Award, recipient Denzel Washington brought his family up on stage with him for the honor. Looking at a tiny piece of paper, he rattled off the names of those who have helped him during his career, and became emotional when he brought up his parents. After a few moments of silence, his wife whispered something to him. "Yes, I do need my glasses!" he laughed. It was a sweet, unscripted moment, made even better by the fact that she, too, forgot her glasses.

Jamie Foxx pulling a Steve Harvey

Jamie Foxx was supposed to present the award for Best Original Score, but first had to get in a Steve Harvey joke. Instead of saying the real winner (Ennio Morricone for Hateful Eight), Foxx said the honor went to Straight Outta Compton, and then immediately went into Harvey mode. "I'm sorry folks, it's right here on the card," he said. "I take full responsibility. I apologize to everybody in Compton, I apologize to Ice Cube. I'm sorry." Foxx used the gag to bring attention to the fact that Straight Outta Compton was snubbed, but with that, let us all vow to stop using Harvey's blunder as a punch line, and let it die in peace (Steve Harvey's Flub, 2015-2016). Catherine Garcia

7:16 a.m. ET

Presidential candidates are just so much more fun after they've dropped out of the race. Take Marco Rubio as an example — the Florida senator has fully embraced his inner Twitter-ranter in recent weeks.

He has also, apparently, embraced his inner robot:

Open the pod bay doors, Rubio. Jeva Lange

6:58 a.m. ET
Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

The FBI and Securities and Exchange Commission are investigating a Tennessee real estate company with personal and financial ties to Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.), The Wall Street Journal reports, and the federal investigators are separately looking into the relationship between Corker and the firm, CBL & Associates Properties Inc. Corker has made millions of dollars through trading CBL stock, some of that profit originally improperly undisclosed in congressional filings; authorities have reportedly found no evidence that Corker committed wrongdoing.

A spokeswoman for Corker, Micah Johnson, blamed the "baseless charges against Senator Corker" on the nonpartisan group Campaign for Accountability, which told The Journal that unfortunately "we don’t have the ability to tell the FBI or SEC what to do." Corker, the chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and member of the Banking Committee, has a long history with CBL and the Lebovitz family that owns it, and CBL insists that nobody at the firm passed Corker insider information. So long as his 70 trades of CBL stock — several trades worth more than $1 million — were not based on inside information, Corker's trading is allowed under congressional ethics rules. Peter Weber

5:58 a.m. ET

Billionaire tech investor Peter Thiel has "played a lead role in bankrolling" Hulk Hogan's lawsuits against Gawker, the first of which ended with a $140 million judgment against Gawker over its publishing of a sex tape starring the wrestler and his friend's wife, Forbes reported Tuesday night, citing "people familiar with the situation." Gawker Media founder Nick Denton, also held personally liable by the Florida jury, speculated to The New York Times earlier Tuesday that perhaps someone in Silicon Valley was funding the Hogan lawsuits and a group of new ones against Gawker and some of its writers, all brought by Los Angeles lawyer Charles Harder.

"If you're a billionaire and you don't like the coverage of you, and you don't particularly want to embroil yourself any further in a public scandal, it's a pretty smart, rational thing to fund other legal cases." Denton said. Unlike the rich and famous in New York and L.A., he reasoned, Silicon Valley's elite isn't used to the glare of tabloid press. And Thiel would seem to have a motive for revenge; Gawker Media's defunct Valleywag site outed him as gay in 2007, and in 2009 he said, "Valleywag is the Silicon Valley equivalent of al Qaeda," with the "psychology of a terrorist." Thiel did not respond to Forbes' request for comment, and Forbes notes that "it is not illegal for an outside entity to help fund another party's lawsuit."

Thiel is maybe the only person in Silicon Valley who supports Donald Trump, but "regardless of his politics, this news should disturb everyone," says Josh Marshall at Talking Points Memo. "People talk a lot about the dominance of the 1 percent or in this case more like a tiny fraction of the 1 percent. But being able to give massive political contributions actually pales in comparison to the impact of being able to destroy a publication you don't like by combining the machinery of the courts with anonymity and unlimited funds to bleed a publication dry. We don't have to go any further than Donald Trump to know that the incredibly rich often use frivolous litigation to intimidate critics and bludgeon enemies." You can learn more in the Forbes report below. Peter Weber

4:59 a.m. ET
William Edwards/AFP/Getty Images

Back in January, when he was having a fight with Fox News, Donald Trump skipped out on a Fox News–sponsored presidential debate and held his own rally and fundraiser for charities dedicated to military veterans. "We just cracked $6 million! Right? $6 million," he said at the Iowa event. And "Donald Trump gave $1 million." That wasn't true until Monday night, David A. Fahrenthold says at The Washington Post, after Fahrenthold had taken to Twitter to try to ascertain how many veterans' charities had received any money from Trump.

On Monday night, Trump called the home of James Kallstrom, chairman of the Marine Corps-Law Enforcement Foundation, and pledged $1 million, according to Kallstrom's wife. When Fahernthold asked Trump over the phone on Tuesday why it took him four months to follow through on his pledge, Trump said, "You have a lot of vetting to do." Fahrenthold suggested that perhaps Trump had only taken action because reporters were asking him about his pledge, and Trump shot back: "You know, you're a nasty guy. You're really a nasty guy. I gave out millions of dollars that I had no obligation to do." Trump also said that the fundraiser had rounded up about $5.5 million total, and that, despite the assertion of campaign manager Corey Lewandowski, no major pledgees had dropped out, though "some of them came through very late."

Trump said he would have his staff send The Washington Post a list of groups that received the donations, but hadn't as of Tuesday night. Veterans' groups have been trying to figure out how to apply for some of the remaining millions, since there is no application process. But at least one group has been contacted since Monday, the Boston Wounded Vet Bike Run, founded by Andrew Biggio. Biggio told The Post that a Trump campaign worker had called him out of the blue on Tuesday to ask for the nonprofit's phone number, and that he hadn't applied for any of the money. However, he did suggest how he got on Trump's radar: "I served in Iraq with Donald Trump's bodyguard's son." You can read more at The Washington Post. Peter Weber

3:36 a.m. ET

Congress has an approval rating of 14 percent, and Seth Meyers has some theories about that. On Tuesday's Late Night, he took a break from the media-consuming presidential campaign to focus on what Congress is not doing. "Obstruction in Congress has been on full display in recent months, with Senate Republicans refusing to even hold hearings on President Obama's nominee to the Supreme Court, Merrick Garland," and House Republicans short-changing anti-Zika funding and playing fast and loose with House rules to thwart an LGBT anti-discrimination bill.

Meyers mocked the Democrats' "lame" recent move to hold mock hearings on Garland, but he spent most of his time focused on the GOP. "So Republicans have basically paralyzed the government, they can't even perform basic constitutional functions or respond to public health emergencies, and maybe the worst is, Republican obstruction has become completely normalized," he said. "No one even questions it anymore." But of course, the presidential race is still the big news, and Meyers found a way to work Donald Trump in at the end. Watch below. Peter Weber

2:56 a.m. ET
Win McNamee/Getty Images

After weeks of speculation, House Speaker Paul Ryan will endorse his party's presumptive presidential nominee, Donald Trump, unidentified senior Trump campaign sources tell ABC News. Ryan is the highest-ranking Republican official, and his endorsement would widely be seen as a sign that the Republican Party is uniting after its divisive primary. The Trump sources did not say when this endorsement would happen, but ABC's Brian McBride noted that Ryan has a press briefing on Wednesday. If Ryan does not endorse Trump then, he will certainly get questions about it. Peter Weber

2:36 a.m. ET
AFP/Getty Images

On Wednesday, the Afghan Taliban confirmed the death of its leader, Mullah Akthar Mansour, killed in a U.S. drone strike, and named his replacement, Mawlawi Haibatullah Akhundzada. The statement was the Taliban's first confirmation of Mansour's death. Akhundzada, a Mansour deputy believed to be 45 to 50 years old, is the former chief of the Taliban courts and is considered more of a religious scholar than military commander; he is responsible for most of the fatwas, or religious edicts, from the Taliban. "Haibatullah Akhundzada has been appointed as the new leader of the Islamic Emirate (Taliban) after a unanimous agreement in the shura," or supreme council, the Taliban said, "and all the members of shura pledged allegiance to him."

Akhundzada was not considered a front-runner to replace Mansour, The New York Times reports, especially since another Mansour deputy, Sarajuddin Haqqani, had been running the day-to-day military operations for the Taliban. But the Taliban leaders meeting in Quetta, Pakistan, apparently wanted a lower-profile consensus candidate, recalling that former Taliban leader Mullah Muhammad Omar's reclusiveness kept him alive for many years. Peter Weber

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