The hole in Josh Hawley's economic argument

Who does his attack on the "cosmopolitan consensus" ultimately serve?

Josh Hawley.
(Image credit: Illustrated | -slav-/iStock, AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, str33tcat/iStock)

Earlier this month, freshman Republican Senator Josh Hawley set off a minor firestorm among the liberal commentariat. His speech at the "National Conservatism" conference indicted an elite class in America that lives by what Hawley called the "cosmopolitan consensus."

"On economics, this consensus favors globalization — closer and closer economic union, more immigration, more movement of capital, more trade on whatever terms," Hawley said. But this consensus has also left everyday working Americans "with flat wages, with lost jobs, with declining investment and declining opportunity. We don't make things here anymore — at least, not the kinds of things a normal person without a fancy degree can build with his hands."

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